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Measuring the effects of removing subsidies for private insurance on public expenditure for health care

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  • Chai Cheng, T.

Abstract

This paper investigates the effects of removing subsidies for private health insurance on public sector expenditure for hospital care. An econometric framework using simultaneous equation models is developed to analyse the interrelated decisions on the intensity and type of health care use and insurance. The results indicate that while privately insured individuals are more likely to seek hospital care as a private patient, they do not differ in their intensity of hospital care use compared with those without private insurance. The simulation results suggest that eliminating subsides could potentially yield substantial public sector savings.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York in its series Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers with number 11/32.

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Date of creation: Oct 2011
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Handle: RePEc:yor:hectdg:11/32

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Postal: HEDG/HERC, Department of Economics and Related Studies, University of York, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
Phone: (0)1904 323776
Fax: (0)1904 323759
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Web page: http://www.york.ac.uk/economics/postgrad/herc/hedg/
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Keywords: Demand for Hospital Care; Private Insurance; Bivariate count data models; Simultaneous equation models; Policy simulation;

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References

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  1. Cameron, A. Colin & Trivedi, Pravin K., 1991. "The role of income and health risk in the choice of health insurance : Evidence from Australia," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 1-28, June.
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  11. López Nicolás, Ángel & Vera-Hernández, Marcos, 2008. "Are tax subsidies for private medical insurance self-financing? Evidence from a microsimulation model," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1285-1298, September.
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  15. Atella, Vincenzo & Deb, Partha, 2008. "Are primary care physicians, public and private sector specialists substitutes or complements? Evidence from a simultaneous equations model for count data," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 770-785, May.
  16. Terence Chai Cheng & Farshid Vahid, 2011. "Demand for Hospital Care and Private Health Insurance in a Mixed Public–Private System: Empirical Evidence Using a Simultaneous Equation Modeling Approach," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2011n22, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  17. Keane, Michael P., 2010. "Structural vs. atheoretic approaches to econometrics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 156(1), pages 3-20, May.
  18. Bhat, Chandra R., 2001. "Quasi-random maximum simulated likelihood estimation of the mixed multinomial logit model," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 35(7), pages 677-693, August.
  19. Gowrisankaran, Gautam & Town, Robert J., 1999. "Estimating the quality of care in hospitals using instrumental variables," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 747-767, December.
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  21. Mark Stabile, 2001. "Private insurance subsidies and public health care markets: evidence from Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 34(4), pages 921-942, November.
  22. Jörgen Hellström, 2006. "A bivariate count data model for household tourism demand," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(2), pages 213-226.
  23. Andreas Million & Regina T. Riphahn & Achim Wambach, 2003. "Incentive effects in the demand for health care: a bivariate panel count data estimation," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(4), pages 387-405.
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Cited by:
  1. Damien S.Eldridge & Ilke Onur & Malathi Velamuri & Cagatay Koc, 2013. "The Impact of Private Hospital Insurance on the Utilization of Hospital Care In Australia," Working Papers 2013.03, School of Economics, La Trobe University.
  2. Cheng, Terence Chai, 2014. "Measuring the effects of reducing subsidies for private insurance on public expenditure for health care," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 159-179.

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