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One Man's Blessing, Another Woman's Curse? Family Factors and the Gender-Earnings Gap of Doctors

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Author Info

  • Stefanie Schurer

    (School of Economics and Finance, Victoria University of Wellington; and Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA))

  • Daniel Kuehnle

    (School of Business and Economics, The University of Erlangen-Nuremberg)

  • Anthony Scott

    ()
    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

  • Terence Chai Cheng

    ()
    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

Abstract

Using data from a new longitudinal survey of doctors from Australia, the authors test whether observed large gender-pay gaps among general practitioners (GPs) are the result of women’s larger willingness to interrupt their careers. On average, female GPs earn A$83,000 or 54% less than male GPs. The difference between men and women with children is A$105,000, and A$45,000 for men and women without children. Of this gap, 66-75% is explained by differences in observable characteristics such as hours worked. The family gap emerges also within the sexes. Female GPs with children experience an earnings penalty of A$15,000-A$25,000 in comparison to women without children; almost 100% of this difference is due to observable characteristics such as hours worked and career interruptions. Male GPs with children experience a family premium of A$35,000 in comparison to men without children, indicating the presence of a breadwinner effect that exacerbates the gender-earnings gap.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne in its series Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series with number wp2012n24.

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Length: 39 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2012n24

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Postal: Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 Australia
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Related research

Keywords: Gender-earnings gap; family-earnings gap; labour force attachment; decomposition methods; family physicians; MABEL;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Cheng, T. C.; & Trivedi, P. K.;, 2014. "Attrition Bias in Panel Data: A Sheep in Wolf's Clothing? A Case Study Based on the MABEL Survey," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York 14/04, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

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