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Discordant city employment cycles

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  • Owyang, Michael T.
  • Piger, Jeremy
  • Wall, Howard J.

Abstract

This paper estimates city-level employment cycles for 58 large U.S. cities and documents the substantial cross-city variation in the timing, lengths, and frequencies of their employment contractions. It also shows how the spread of city-level contractions associated with U.S. recessions has tended to follow recession-specific geographic patterns. In addition, cities within the same state or region have tended to have similar employment cycles. We find no evidence that similarities in employment cycles are related to similarities in industry mix, although cities with more-similar high school attainment, mean establishment size, and industrial diversity have tended to have more-similar employment cycles.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Regional Science and Urban Economics.

Volume (Year): 43 (2013)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 367-384

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Handle: RePEc:eee:regeco:v:43:y:2013:i:2:p:367-384

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Keywords: City employment cycles;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Wall, Howard J., 2013. "The employment cycles of neighboring cities," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 177-185.
  2. Rui Pereira, 2014. "Okun’s law, asymmetries and regional spillovers: evidence from Virginia metropolitan statistical areas and the District of Columbia," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, Springer, vol. 52(2), pages 583-595, March.

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