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Wagner'S Law Revisited: A Note From South Africa

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  • KOJO MENYAH
  • YEMANE WOLDE-RUFAEL
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1813-6982.2011.01275.x
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    Article provided by Economic Society of South Africa in its journal South African Journal of Economics.

    Volume (Year): 80 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 2 (06)
    Pages: 200-208

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    Handle: RePEc:bla:sajeco:v:80:y:2012:i:2:p:200-208

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    1. Perron, P., 1994. "Further Evidence on Breaking Trend Functions in Macroeconomic Variables," Cahiers de recherche 9421, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
    2. Kalam Mohammad Abul & Aziz Nusrate, 2009. "Growth of Government Expenditure in Bangladesh: An Empirical Enquiry into the Validity of Wagner's Law," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 9(2), pages 1-20, June.
    3. James Alm & Abel Embaye, 2010. "Explaining The Growth Of Government Spending In South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 78(2), pages 152-169, 06.
    4. Zivot, Eric & Andrews, Donald W K, 2002. "Further Evidence on the Great Crash, the Oil-Price Shock, and the Unit-Root Hypothesis," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(1), pages 25-44, January.
    5. Sunday Osaretin Iyare & Troy Lorde, 2004. "Co-integration, causality and Wagner's law: tests for selected Caribbean countries," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(13), pages 815-825.
    6. M. I. Ansari & D. V. Gordon & C. Akuamoah, 1997. "Keynes versus Wagner: public expenditure and national income for three African countries," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(4), pages 543-550.
    7. Paresh Kumar Narayan, 2005. "The saving and investment nexus for China: evidence from cointegration tests," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(17), pages 1979-1990.
    8. Ang, James B., 2008. "Economic development, pollutant emissions and energy consumption in Malaysia," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 271-278.
    9. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 1991. "A simple estimator of cointegrating vectors in higher order integrated systems," Working Paper Series, Macroeconomic Issues 91-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    10. Harvey, David I & Leybourne, Stephen J & Newbold, Paul, 2001. " Innovational Outlier Unit Root Tests with an Endogenously Determined Break in Level," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 63(5), pages 559-75, December.
    11. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
    12. Hassan Mohammadi & Murat Cak & Demet Cak, 2008. "Wagner's hypothesis: New evidence from Turkey using the bounds testing approach," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 35(1), pages 94-106, March.
    13. Akitoby, Bernardin & Clements, Benedict & Gupta, Sanjeev & Inchauste, Gabriela, 2006. "Public spending, voracity, and Wagner's law in developing countries," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 908-924, December.
    14. Alan T. Peacock & Jack Wiseman, 1961. "The Growth of Public Expenditure in the United Kingdom," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number peac61-1.
    15. Phillips, Peter C B & Hansen, Bruce E, 1990. "Statistical Inference in Instrumental Variables Regression with I(1) Processes," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(1), pages 99-125, January.
    16. Engle, Robert F & Granger, Clive W J, 1987. "Co-integration and Error Correction: Representation, Estimation, and Testing," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(2), pages 251-76, March.
    17. Emmanuel Ziramba, 2008. "Wagner'S Law: An Econometric Test For South Africa, 1960-2006," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 76(4), pages 596-606, December.
    18. M. Hashem Pesaran & Yongcheol Shin & Richard J. Smith, 2001. "Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationships," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 289-326.
    19. Tania Ajam & Janine Aron, 2007. "Fiscal Renaissance in a Democratic South Africa," CSAE Working Paper Series 2007-10, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    20. Payne, James E & Ewing, Bradley T, 1996. "International Evidence on Wagner's Hypothesis: A Cointegration Analysis," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 51(2), pages 258-74.
    21. James Ang, 2007. "Are saving and investment cointegrated? The case of Malaysia (1965-2003)," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(17), pages 2167-2174.
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    Cited by:
    1. Retselisitsoe I. Thamae, 2013. "The Growth of Government Spending in Lesotho," Economic Analysis and Policy (EAP), Queensland University of Technology (QUT), School of Economics and Finance, vol. 43(3), pages 339-352, December.
    2. Alimi, R. Santos, 2014. "A Time Series and Panel Analysis of Government Spending and National Income," MPRA Paper 56994, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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