Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

A multivariate analysis of the causal flow between renewable energy consumption and GDP in Tunisia

Contents:

Author Info

  • Ben Salha, Ousama
  • Sebri, Maamar

Abstract

This paper examines the causality linkages between economic growth, renewable energy consumption, CO2 emissions and domestic investment in Tunisia between 1971 and 2010. Using the ARDL bounds testing approach to cointegration, long-run relationships between the variables are identified. The Granger causality analysis, on the other hand, indicates that there is bi-directional causality between renewable energy consumption and economic growth, which supports the feedback hypothesis in Tunisia. In addition, the quantity of CO2 emissions collapses as a reaction to an increase in renewable energy consumption. These findings remain robust even when controlling for the presence of structural break. We conclude that more efforts should be undertaken to further develop a suitable infrastructure to the renewable energy sector, given its enhancing-effects on economic growth and reducing-effects on CO2 emissions.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/52572/
File Function: original version
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 52572.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 29 Dec 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:52572

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Schackstr. 4, D-80539 Munich, Germany
Phone: +49-(0)89-2180-2219
Fax: +49-(0)89-2180-3900
Web page: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: ARDL; Economic growth; Granger causality; Renewable energy consumption; Structural break; Tunisia.;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Perron, P., 1990. "Further Evidence On Breaking Trend Functions In Macroeconomics Variables," Papers 350, Princeton, Department of Economics - Econometric Research Program.
  2. Sadorsky, Perry, 2009. "Renewable energy consumption and income in emerging economies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 4021-4028, October.
  3. Barro, R.J., 1989. "Economic Growth In A Cross Section Of Countries," RCER Working Papers 201, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  4. Mehdi Abid & Maamar Sebri, 2012. "Energy Consumption-Economic Growth Nexus: Does the Level of Aggregation Matter?," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 2(2), pages 55-62.
  5. Ben Aïssa, Mohamed Safouane & Ben Jebli, Mehdi & Ben Youssef, Slim, 2014. "Output, renewable energy consumption and trade in Africa," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 11-18.
  6. Paresh Kumar Narayan, 2005. "The saving and investment nexus for China: evidence from cointegration tests," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(17), pages 1979-1990.
  7. Belloumi, Mounir, 2009. "Energy consumption and GDP in Tunisia: Cointegration and causality analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(7), pages 2745-2753, July.
  8. Mohsen Bahmani-Oskooee & Hafez Rehman, 2005. "Stability of the money demand function in Asian developing countries," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(7), pages 773-792.
  9. Pahlavani, M., 2005. "Cointegration and Structural Change in the Exports-Gdp Nexus: The Case of Iran, 1960-2003," International Journal of Applied Econometrics and Quantitative Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 2(4), pages 37-56.
  10. Sadorsky, Perry, 2009. "Renewable energy consumption, CO2 emissions and oil prices in the G7 countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 456-462, May.
  11. Apergis, Nicholas & Payne, James E., 2012. "Renewable and non-renewable energy consumption-growth nexus: Evidence from a panel error correction model," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 733-738.
  12. Seema Narayan & Paresh Kumar Narayan, 2005. "An empirical analysis of Fiji's import demand function," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 32(2), pages 158-168, May.
  13. Stephen Leybourne & Tae-Hwan Kim & Paul Newbold, 2005. "Examination of Some More Powerful Modifications of the Dickey-Fuller Test," Journal of Time Series Analysis, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(3), pages 355-369, 05.
  14. Balázs Égert & Rebeca Jiménez-Rodríguez & Evžen Kočenda & Amalia Morales-Zumaquero, 2006. "Structural changes in Central and Eastern European economies: breaking news or breaking the ice?," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 39(1), pages 85-103, June.
  15. Boubaker, K., 2012. "Renewable energy in upper North Africa: Present versus 2025-horizon perspectives optimization using a Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) framework," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 364-369.
  16. Menegaki, Angeliki N., 2011. "Growth and renewable energy in Europe: A random effect model with evidence for neutrality hypothesis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 257-263, March.
  17. Ben Salha Ousama, 2013. "Economic Globalization, Wages and Wage Inequality in Tunisia: An ARDL Bounds Testing Approach," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, De Gruyter, vol. 9(3), pages 321-356, December.
  18. Ozturk, Ilhan & Acaravci, Ali, 2011. "Electricity consumption and real GDP causality nexus: Evidence from ARDL bounds testing approach for 11 MENA countries," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 88(8), pages 2885-2892, August.
  19. Kumar, Saten & Pacheco, Gail, 2012. "What determines the long run growth rate in Kenya?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 705-718.
  20. Zivot, Eric & Andrews, Donald W K, 2002. "Further Evidence on the Great Crash, the Oil-Price Shock, and the Unit-Root Hypothesis," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(1), pages 25-44, January.
  21. Tugcu, Can Tansel & Ozturk, Ilhan & Aslan, Alper, 2012. "Renewable and non-renewable energy consumption and economic growth relationship revisited: Evidence from G7 countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 1942-1950.
  22. Odhiambo, Nicholas M., 2009. "Energy consumption and economic growth nexus in Tanzania: An ARDL bounds testing approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 617-622, February.
  23. Holtz-Eakin, Douglas & Selden, Thomas M., 1995. "Stoking the fires? CO2 emissions and economic growth," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 85-101, May.
  24. Heil, Mark T. & Selden, Thomas M., 2001. "Carbon emissions and economic development: future trajectories based on historical experience," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 6(01), pages 63-83, February.
  25. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
  26. Menyah, Kojo & Wolde-Rufael, Yemane, 2010. "CO2 emissions, nuclear energy, renewable energy and economic growth in the US," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 2911-2915, June.
  27. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 1991. "A simple estimator of cointegrating vectors in higher order integrated systems," Working Paper Series, Macroeconomic Issues 91-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  28. Jalil, Abdul & Feridun, Mete, 2011. "The impact of growth, energy and financial development on the environment in China: A cointegration analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 284-291, March.
  29. Sebri, Maamar & Abid, Mehdi, 2012. "Energy use for economic growth: A trivariate analysis from Tunisian agriculture sector," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 711-716.
  30. Yildirim, Ertuğrul & Saraç, Şenay & Aslan, Alper, 2012. "Energy consumption and economic growth in the USA: Evidence from renewable energy," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 16(9), pages 6770-6774.
  31. M. Hashem Pesaran & Yongcheol Shin & Richard J. Smith, 2001. "Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationships," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 289-326.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:52572. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ekkehart Schlicht).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.