IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!)

Citations for "Inflation Targeting under Imperfect Knowledge"

by Athanasios Orphanides & John C. Williams

For a complete description of this item, click here. For a RSS feed for citations of this item, click here.
as in new window

  1. Edward Nelson, 2007. "The Great Inflation and Early Disinflation in Japan and Germany," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 3(4), pages 23-76, December.
  2. Salle, Isabelle L., 2015. "Modeling expectations in agent-based models — An application to central bank's communication and monetary policy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 130-141.
  3. Dräger, Lena & Lamla, Michael, 2013. "Anchoring of Consumers' Inflation Expectations: Evidence from Microdata," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79889, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  4. Isabelle Salle & Murat Yildizoglu & Marc-Alexandre Sénégas, 2012. "Inflation targeting in a learning economy: an ABM perspective," Post-Print hal-00798174, HAL.
  5. Athanasios Orphanides & John C. Williams, 2008. "Learning, Expectations Formation, And The Pitfalls Of Optimal Control Monetary Policy," CAMA Working Papers 2008-17, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  6. Beechey, Meredith & Österholm, Pär, 2010. "Forecasting inflation in an inflation-targeting regime: A role for informative steady-state priors," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 248-264, April.
  7. Volker Wieland, 2008. "Learning, Endogenous Indexation, and Disinflation in the New-Keynesian Model," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 493, Central Bank of Chile.
  8. John C Williams & Athanasios Orphanides, 2005. "Robust Monetary Policy with Imperfect Knowledge," Computing in Economics and Finance 2005 400, Society for Computational Economics.
  9. Athanasios Orphanides & John C. Williams, 2006. "Monetary Policy with Imperfect Knowledge," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 4(2-3), pages 366-375, 04-05.
  10. Richard Dennis & Federico Ravenna, 2007. "Learning and optimal monetary policy," Working Paper Series 2007-19, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  11. Athanasios Orphanides & John C. Williams, 2010. "Monetary policy mistakes and the evolution of inflation expectations," Working Paper Series 2010-12, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  12. Roberto Tamborini, 2008. "The macroeconomics of imperfect capital markets. Whither saving-investment imbalances?," Department of Economics Working Papers 0815, Department of Economics, University of Trento, Italia.
  13. Athanasios Orphanides & John C. Williams, 2008. "Imperfect knowledge and the pitfalls of optimal control monetary policy," Working Paper Series 2008-09, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  14. Mateusz Machaj, . "Can the Taylor Rule be a Good Guidance for Policy? The Case of 2001-2008 Real Estate Bubble," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 0, pages 1-15.
  15. Milani, Fabio, 2014. "Learning and time-varying macroeconomic volatility," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 94-114.
  16. Martin Melecky & Diego Rodríguez Palenzuela & Ulf Söderström, 2008. "Inflation Target Transparency and the Macroeconomy," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 490, Central Bank of Chile.
  17. Zheng Liu & Justin Weidner, 2011. "Does headline inflation converge to core?," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue aug1.
  18. Bodenstein Martin R. & Armenter Roc, 2009. "Of Nutters and Doves," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-22, September.
  19. Federico Ravenna & Carl E. Walsh, 2011. "Welfare-Based Optimal Monetary Policy with Unemployment and Sticky Prices: A Linear-Quadratic Framework," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 130-62, April.
  20. Athanasios Orphanides, 2007. "Taylor rules," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2007-18, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  21. Lombardi, Marco J. & Sgherri, Silvia, 2007. "(Un)naturally low? Sequential Monte Carlo tracking of the US natural interest rate," Working Paper Series 0794, European Central Bank.
  22. Pfajfar, D. & Santoro, E., 2012. "Credit Market Distortions, Asset Prices and Monetary Policy," Discussion Paper 2012-010, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  23. Raissi, Mehdi, 2015. "Flexible inflation targeting and labor market inefficiencies," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 283-300.
  24. Ali, Syed Zahid & Anwar, Sajid, 2013. "Inflation and interest rates in the presence of a cost channel, wealth effect and agent heterogeneity," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 286-296.
  25. van der Ploeg, Frederick, 2009. "Prudent monetary policy and prediction of the output gap," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 217-230, June.
  26. Bahaj, Saleem & Foulis, Angus, 2016. "Macroprudential policy under uncertainty," Bank of England working papers 584, Bank of England.
  27. Yu-chin Chen & Pisut Kulthanavit, 2008. "Adaptive Learning and Monetary Policy: Lessons from Japan," Working Papers UWEC-2008-12-P, University of Washington, Department of Economics, revised Oct 2008.
  28. Thorvardur Tjörvi Ólafsson, 2006. "The New Keynesian Phillips Curve: In Search of Improvements and Adaptation to the Open Economy," Economics wp31_tjorvi, Department of Economics, Central bank of Iceland.
  29. Sirchenko, Andrei, 2010. "Policymakers' Votes and Predictability of Monetary Policy," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt8qj3z3qg, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
  30. Paciello, Luigi, 2007. "The Response of Prices to Technology and Monetary Policy Shocks under Rational Inattention," MPRA Paper 5763, University Library of Munich, Germany.
This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.