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Citations for "Some Like it Smooth, and Some Like it Rough: Untangling Continuous and Jump Components in Measuring, Modeling, and Forecasting Asset Return Volatility"

by Torben G. Andersen & Tim Bollerslev & Francis X. Diebold

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  1. Carla Ysusi, 2006. "Estimating Integrated Volatility Using Absolute High-Frequency Returns," Working Papers 2006-13, Banco de México.
  2. Lars Forsberg & Eric Ghysels, 2007. "Why Do Absolute Returns Predict Volatility So Well?," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 5(1), pages 31-67.
  3. Morten Ørregaard Nielsen & Per Houmann Frederiksen, 2005. "Finite Sample Accuracy of Integrated Volatility Estimators," Working Papers 1225, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  4. Mende, Alexander, 2005. "09/11 on the USD/EUR Foreign Exchange Market," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-312, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
  5. Çelik, Sibel & Ergin, Hüseyin, 2014. "Volatility forecasting using high frequency data: Evidence from stock markets," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 176-190.
  6. repec:oxf:wpaper:2003-w18 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Cartea, Álvaro & Karyampas, Dimitrios, 2009. "The relationship between the volatility of returns and the number of jumps in financial markets," DEE - Working Papers. Business Economics. WB wb097508, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía de la Empresa.
  8. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen & Neil Shephard, 2005. "Variation, jumps, market frictions and high frequency data in financial econometrics," Economics Papers 2005-W16, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  9. Ghysels, Eric & Santa-Clara, Pedro & Valkanov, Rossen, 2006. "Predicting volatility: getting the most out of return data sampled at different frequencies," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 131(1-2), pages 59-95.
  10. Jeremy Large, 2005. "Estimating quadratic variation when quoted prices jump by a constant increment," Economics Papers 2005-W05, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  11. Talpsepp, Tõnn & Rieger, Marc Oliver, 2010. "Explaining asymmetric volatility around the world," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 17(5), pages 938-956, December.
  12. Audrino, Francesco & Camponovo, Lorenzo & Roth, Constantin, 2015. "Testing the lag structure of assets’ realized volatility dynamics," Economics Working Paper Series 1501, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
  13. Zheng, Tingguo & Zuo, Haomiao, 2013. "Reexamining the time-varying volatility spillover effects: A Markov switching causality approach," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 643-662.
  14. Laurent E. Calvet & Adlai J. Fisher, 2005. "Multifrequency News and Stock Returns," NBER Working Papers 11441, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Carla Ysusi, 2006. "Detecting Jumps in High-Frequency Financial Series Using Multipower Variation," Working Papers 2006-10, Banco de México.
  16. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen & Sven Erik Graversen & Jean Jacod & Neil Shephard, 2005. "Limit theorems for bipower variation in financial econometrics," OFRC Working Papers Series 2005fe09, Oxford Financial Research Centre.
  17. Heather Anderson & Fashid Vahid, 2005. "Forecasting the Volatility of Australian Stock Returns: Do Common Factors Help?," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2005-451, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
  18. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00188331 is not listed on IDEAS
  19. Taamouti, Abderrahim & García, René & Dufour, Jean-Marie, 2008. "Measuring causality between volatility and returns with high-frequency data," UC3M Working papers. Economics we084422, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
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