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Searching for a Franco-German consensus on the future of Europe: Survey results for Bundestag, Assemblée Nationale and Sénat

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  • Blesse, Sebastian
  • Boyer, Pierre C.
  • Heinemann, Friedrich
  • Janeba, Eckhard

Abstract

The Brexit referendum and the decision of British voters to leave the EU have sparked a comprehensive debate on the future of European integration. A key issue in this debate is the appropriate division of responsibilities between the EU and its Member States. The EU might still lack certain competencies which are crucial for a functioning Union or resilient euro area. At the same time, however, some of the EU's existing competencies might be better allocated to Member States. This policy brief documents results from a survey on the future of European integration conducted in the national parliaments of both France and Germany, including the French Sénat, the Assemblée Nationale and the German Bundestag, between April and July 2016.

Suggested Citation

  • Blesse, Sebastian & Boyer, Pierre C. & Heinemann, Friedrich & Janeba, Eckhard, 2016. "Searching for a Franco-German consensus on the future of Europe: Survey results for Bundestag, Assemblée Nationale and Sénat," ZEW policy briefs 5/2016, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewpbs:52016
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Friedrich Heinemann & Eckhard Janeba, 2011. "Viewing Tax Policy Through Party‐Colored Glasses: What German Politicians Believe," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 12(3), pages 286-311, August.
    2. Osterloh, Steffen & Heinemann, Friedrich, 2013. "The political economy of corporate tax harmonization — Why do European politicians (dis)like minimum tax rates?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 18-37.
    3. Mathias Dolls & Clemens Fuest & Dirk Neumann & Andreas Peichl, 2018. "An unemployment insurance scheme for the euro area? A comparison of different alternatives using microdata," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 25(1), pages 273-309, February.
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    5. Berger, Melissa & Heinemann, Friedrich, 2016. "Why and how there should be more Europe in asylum policies," ZEW policy briefs 1/2016, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mathias Dolls, 2019. "An Unemployment Re-Insurance Scheme for the Eurozone? Stabilizing and Redistributive Effects," EconPol Policy Reports 10, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    2. Sarah Ciaglia & Clemens Fuest & Friedrich Heinemann, 2018. "What a feeling?! How to promote ‘European Identity’," EconPol Policy Reports 9, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.

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