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The Economic Impact of Olympic Games: Evidence from Stock Markets


  • Dick, Christian D.
  • Wang, Qingwei


By means of an event study of stock market reactions to the announcement of the Olympic Games host cities, we find a significant and positive announcement effect of hosting the Summer Games, with a cumulative abnormal return of about 2% within a few days. We do not find any significant results for the Winter Games. Neither do we detect a significant impact when bidders lose the competition. Our results differ from those of a similar study by Mirman and Sharma (2008), who find that the Winter Games are subject to a significantly negative announcement impact, while the Summer Games are not. Our results, however, rely on a larger sample of 15 Olympic events and are obtained by assessing the abnormal returns after the announcement against a ?business?as?usual" situation (instead of testing the difference between winner group and loser group). Our findings are in line with economic intuition, since the Summer Games represent a larger event and are thus more likely to have a significant impact. We also find that among the winners, small economies tend to have greater cumulative abnormal returns than their large peers.

Suggested Citation

  • Dick, Christian D. & Wang, Qingwei, 2008. "The Economic Impact of Olympic Games: Evidence from Stock Markets," ZEW Discussion Papers 08-060, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:7383

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gabrielle Berman & Robert Brooks & Sinclair Davidson, 2000. "The Sydney Olympic Games announcement and Australian stock market reaction," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(12), pages 781-784.
    2. A. Craig MacKinlay, 1997. "Event Studies in Economics and Finance," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(1), pages 13-39, March.
    3. Nikolaos Veraros & Evangelia Kasimati & Peter Dawson, 2004. "The 2004 Olympic Games announcement and its effect on the Athens and Milan stock exchanges," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(12), pages 749-753.
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    More about this item


    Olympic Games; economic impact; event study; stock markets;

    JEL classification:

    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • L83 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Sports; Gambling; Restaurants; Recreation; Tourism

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