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Pollution externalities in a Schumpeterian growth model

  • Koesler, Simon

This paper extends a standard Schumpeterian growth model to include an environmental dimension. Thereby, it explicitly links the pollution intensity of economic activity to technological progress. In a second step, it investigates the effect of pollution on economic growth under the assumption that pollution intensities are related to technological progress. Several conclusions emerge from the model. In equilibrium, the economy follows a balanced growth path. The effect of pollution on the economic growth rate vitally depends on the households' degree of pollution aversion and on the link between pollution intensity and the technology level. The decentralized solution does not meet the social optimum, though the social optimum can be implemented through the introduction of subsidies and pollution permits. Expectedly, the introduction of a pollution threshold stalls growth if pollution is not decoupled from economic growth and the possibility of pollution abatement allows the economy to grow at a higher rate.

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Paper provided by ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research in its series ZEW Discussion Papers with number 10-055.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:10055
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  1. Smulders, J.A. & Gradus, R.H.J.M., 1993. "Pollution abatement and long-term growth," Discussion Paper 1993-73, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  2. Dinopoulos, Elias & Thompson, Peter, 1998. " Schumpeterian Growth without Scale Effects," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 3(4), pages 313-35, December.
  3. Raymond Gradus & Sjak Smulders, 1993. "The trade-off between environmental care and long-term growth—Pollution in three prototype growth models," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 58(1), pages 25-51, February.
  4. Philippe Michel & Gilles Rotillon, 1995. "Disutility of pollution and endogenous growth," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 6(3), pages 279-300, October.
  5. Xepapadeas, Anastasios, 2005. "Economic growth and the environment," Handbook of Environmental Economics, in: K. G. Mäler & J. R. Vincent (ed.), Handbook of Environmental Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 23, pages 1219-1271 Elsevier.
  6. Hart, Rob, 2004. "Growth, environment and innovation--a model with production vintages and environmentally oriented research," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 48(3), pages 1078-1098, November.
  7. Grimaud, Andre, 1999. "Pollution Permits and Sustainable Growth in a Schumpeterian Model," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 249-266, November.
  8. repec:ema:worpap:2004-23 is not listed on IDEAS
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