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German Consumption Inequality. An evaluation with a focus on the financial crisis

Listed author(s):
  • Heinrichs, Katrin

How did the financial crisis impact on German demand? Are there significant differences in consumption behaviour depending on income? We analyse consumption data from 2005 to 2012/13 and find some indication for divergence of different income categories' consumption after 2009 and for a higher real interest rate sensitivity of higher income earners' consumption. Like in studies of income and wealth inequality, we also see a slight upward trend in consumption inequality that might have briefly staggered when the financial crisis hit.

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File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/145891/1/VfS_2016_pid_7012.pdf
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Paper provided by Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association in its series Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change with number 145891.

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Date of creation: 2016
Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc16:145891
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.socialpolitik.org/
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  1. Florian Hoffmann & Thomas Lemieux, 2016. "Unemployment in the Great Recession: A Comparison of Germany, Canada, and the United States," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(S1), pages 95-139.
  2. Singh, S K & Maddala, G S, 1976. "A Function for Size Distribution of Incomes," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 44(5), pages 963-970, September.
  3. Nicola Fuchs-Schuendeln & Dirk Krueger & Mathias Sommer, 2010. "Inequality Trends for Germany in the Last Two Decades: A Tale of Two Countries," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 13(1), pages 103-132, January.
  4. Grabka, Markus M., 2015. "Income and Wealth Inequality after the Financial Crisis : the Case of Germany," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 371-390.
  5. Anthony B. Atkinson & Salvatore Morelli, 2014. "Chartbook of economic inequality," Working Papers 324, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  6. Stracca, Livio, 2010. "Is the New Keynesian IS curve structural?," Working Paper Series 1236, European Central Bank.
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