IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Lead markets in age-based innovations

  • Levsen, Nils
  • Herstatt, Cornelius
Registered author(s):

    The trend of population aging is affecting an increasing number of countries around the world, especially advanced economies. One consequence of a growing population share of aged persons is a shift in consumer needs, reflected by a rising number of products and services designed particularly for elderly users. Thus, population aging is a catalyst for new markets and a driver of innovation. A common objective of such age-based innovations is the delay of an age-associated decline in individual autonomy or the restoration of autonomy losses already incurred. In particular, age-based innovations aim to compensate ageassociated deficiencies in sensory perception, cognitive skills, and musculoskeletal status. Age-based innovations are marked by a high level of heterogeneity, both in terms of functionality (e.g. mobility, mental stimulation, financial services) and in terms of industry (e.g. consumer electronics, automotive, banking). Different countries undergo population aging at different times and with different magnitude. As some countries have experienced the phenomenon earlier than others, they have had more time to react and create innovations in response to it. This brings about the question of lead markets - country markets with the characteristic that product or process innovation designs adopted early become the globally dominant design and supersede other innovation designs initially adopted or preferred by other countries (Beise 2001, p.10). Do such lead markets exist within the field of age-based innovations? Moreover, is there possibly a single lead market which consistently leads adoption and diffusion across the heterogeneous range of age-based innovations? Finally, is extant lead market theory applicable to the entirety of age-based innovations - a field of business, where innovation is driven not only by profitability-focused stakeholders but also by a multitude of other stakeholders? These questions delineate a research gap at the intersection of lead market research and age-based innovations research. In order to answer them, a multi-methodology approach was adopted. [...]

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/92939/1/778926869.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Paper provided by Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH), Institute for Technology and Innovation Management in its series Working Papers with number 80.

    as
    in new window

    Length:
    Date of creation: 2014
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:zbw:tuhtim:80
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Schwarzenbergstra├če 95, 21073 Hamburg
    Phone: +49/ (0)40/ 42878 - 3777
    Fax: +49/ (0)40/ 42878 - 2867
    Web page: http://www.tu-harburg.de/tim/index_en.html

    More information through EDIRC

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Utterback, James M & Abernathy, William J, 1975. "A dynamic model of process and product innovation," Omega, Elsevier, vol. 3(6), pages 639-656, December.
    2. Beise, Marian & Cleff, Thomas, 2004. "Assessing the lead market potential of countries for innovation projects," Journal of International Management, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 453-477.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:tuhtim:80. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ZBW - German National Library of Economics)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.