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Financial development and economic growth: A new empirical analysis

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  • Graff, Michael

Abstract

The paper describes tests of hypotheses from economic history concerning the significance of financial development as a determinant of economic growth. It goes beyond the existing studies in drawing on a large panel data set covering 93 countries from 1970-90 and includes a new proxy for the resource input into the financial system. Moreover, interaction effects between financial development and catching-up as well as education are considered. Finally, to clarify causal relationships, a two-wave path model is estimated. It is shown that during the 1970s and 1980s finance was a significant and predominantly supply-leading determinant of growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Graff, Michael, 1999. "Financial development and economic growth: A new empirical analysis," Dresden Discussion Paper Series in Economics 05/99, Technische Universität Dresden, Faculty of Business and Economics, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:tuddps:0599
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ross Levine, 1997. "Financial Development and Economic Growth: Views and Agenda," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(2), pages 688-726, June.
    2. Douglas W. Diamond & Philip H. Dybvig, 2000. "Bank runs, deposit insurance, and liquidity," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 14-23.
    3. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-437.
    4. Benhabib, Jess & Spiegel, Mark M., 1994. "The role of human capital in economic development evidence from aggregate cross-country data," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 143-173, October.
    5. Sala-i-Martin, Xavier, 1997. "I Just Ran Two Million Regressions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(2), pages 178-183, May.
    6. Harberger, Arnold C, 1998. "A Vision of the Growth Process," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(1), pages 1-32, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Maswana, Jean-Claude, 2006. "An empirical investigation around the finance-growth puzzle in China with a particular focus on causality and efficiency considerations," MPRA Paper 3946, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Apr 2006.
    2. OBREJA-BRASOVEANU, Laura, 2011. "Size and quality of public sector and economic growth changes occurring in the former communist EU countries," Working Papers 17/2011, Universidade Portucalense, Centro de Investigação em Gestão e Economia (CIGE).
    3. Farah Hussain & Deb Kumar Chakraborty, 2012. "Causality between Financial Development and Economic Growth: Evidence from an Indian State," Romanian Economic Journal, Department of International Business and Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, vol. 15(35), pages 27-48, September.
    4. Borlea Sorin Nicolae & Puscas Adriana & Mare Codruta & Achim Monica Violeta, 2016. "Direction of Causality Between Financial Development and Economic Growth. Evidence for Developing Countries," Studia Universitatis „Vasile Goldis” Arad – Economics Series, De Gruyter Open, vol. 26(2), pages 1-22, June.
    5. Akinola Ezekiel Morakinyo & Mabutho Sibanda, 2016. "Non-Performing Loans and Economic Growth in Nigeria: A Dynamic Analysis," SPOUDAI Journal of Economics and Business, SPOUDAI Journal of Economics and Business, University of Piraeus, pages 61-81.
    6. Nyasha, Sheilla & Odhiambo, Nicholas M., 2016. "Financial intermediaries, capital markets, and economic growth: empirical evidence from six countries," Working Papers 19908, University of South Africa, Department of Economics.
    7. Ho, Sin-Yu & Njindan Iyke, Bernard, 2017. "Empirical Reassessment of Bank-based Financial Development and Economic Growth in Hong Kong," MPRA Paper 78920, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Nyasha, Sheilla & Gwenhure, Yvonne & Odhiambo, Nicholas M., 2017. "The Dynamic Causal Linkage Between Financial Development And Economic Growth: Empirical Evidence From Ethiopia," Economia Internazionale / International Economics, Camera di Commercio Industria Artigianato Agricoltura di Genova, vol. 70(1), pages 73-102.
    9. Nicholas Odhiambo, 2009. "Interest Rate Liberalization and Economic Growth in Zambia: A Dynamic Linkage," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 21(3), pages 541-557.
    10. Nicholas Odhiambo, 2010. "Finance-investment-growth nexus in South Africa: an ARDL-bounds testing procedure," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 205-219, August.
    11. Laura Obreja Braşoveanu, 2012. "Correlation Between Government and Economic Growth - Specific Features for 10 Nms," Journal of Knowledge Management, Economics and Information Technology, ScientificPapers.org, vol. 2(5), pages 1-14, October.

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