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The welfare effects of discriminating between in-state and out-of-state students

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  • Hübner, Malte

Abstract

This paper considers the decentralized funding of public universities in a federation when students and graduates are mobile. In particular, I discuss whether local governments should be given the right to differentiate tuition fees between in-state and out-of-state students. I develop a model of decentralized decision making which allows me to draw conclusions about how such a price-discrimination affects welfare and the number of students in a federation. It is shown that local governments differentiate fees if allowed to do so and that this reduces the mobility of students and federal welfare. To assess the impact of differentiated fees on the number of students in the federation this paper extends previous work by endogenizing the number of students. The model predicts that when differentiated fees are used less individuals decide to attend university.

Suggested Citation

  • Hübner, Malte, 2009. "The welfare effects of discriminating between in-state and out-of-state students," Working Papers 02/2009, German Council of Economic Experts / Sachverständigenrat zur Begutachtung der gesamtwirtschaftlichen Entwicklung.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:svrwwp:022009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kemnitz, Alexander, 2005. "Educational Federalism and the Quality Effects of Tuition Fees," Discussion Papers 617, Institut fuer Volkswirtschaftslehre und Statistik, Abteilung fuer Volkswirtschaftslehre.
    2. Oliver Busch & Benjamin Weigert, 2010. "Where have all the graduates gone? Internal cross-state migration of graduates in Germany 1984–2004," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 44(3), pages 559-572, June.
    3. Janeba, Eckhard & Peters, Wolfgang, 1999. "Tax Evasion, Tax Competition and the Gains from Nondiscrimination: The Case of Interest Taxation in Europe," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(452), pages 93-101, January.
    4. Lydia Mechtenberg & Roland Strausz, 2008. "The Bologna process: how student mobility affects multi-cultural skills and educational quality," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 15(2), pages 109-130, April.
    5. Justman, Moshe & Thisse, Jacques-Francois, 1997. "Implications of the mobility of skilled labor for local public funding of higher education," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 409-412, September.
    6. Moshe Justman & Jacques-Francois Thisse, 2000. "Local Public Funding of Higher Education When Skilled Labor is Imperfectly Mobile," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 7(3), pages 247-258, May.
    7. Keen, Michael, 2001. "Preferential Regimes Can Make Tax Competition Less Harmful," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 54(n. 4), pages 757-62, December.
    8. Noorbakhsh, Abbas & Culp, David, 2002. "The demand for higher education: Pennsylvania's nonresident tuition experience," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 277-286, June.
    9. Haupt, Alexander & Peters, Wolfgang, 2005. "Restricting preferential tax regimes to avoid harmful tax competition," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 493-507, September.
    10. Tim Krieger & Thomas Lange, 2010. "Education policy and tax competition with imperfect student and labor mobility," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 17(6), pages 587-606, December.
    11. Janeba, Eckhard & Smart, Michael, 2003. "Is Targeted Tax Competition Less Harmful Than Its Remedies?," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 10(3), pages 259-280, May.
    12. Alejandro Esteller-Moré & Albert Solé-Ollé, 2002. "Tax Setting in a Federal System: The Case of Personal Income Taxation in Canada," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 9(3), pages 235-257, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alexander Haupt & Tim Krieger & Thomas Lange, 2011. "Competition for the International Pool of Talent: Education Policy and Student Mobility," Working Papers CIE 35, Paderborn University, CIE Center for International Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    fiscal federalism; funding of higher education; student mobility; tuition fees; preferential tax regimes;

    JEL classification:

    • H42 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Publicly Provided Private Goods
    • H72 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Budget and Expenditures
    • H71 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid

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