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Cycling on the extensive and intensive margin: The role of paths and prices

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  • Frondel, Manuel
  • Vance, Colin

Abstract

Drawing on a panel of German survey data spanning 1997-2013, this paper identifi es the correlates of non-recreational bicycling, focusing specifi cally on the roles of bicycle paths and fuel prices. Our approach conceptualizes ridership as a two stage decision process comprising the discrete choice of whether to use the bike (i.e. the intensive margin) and the continuous choice of how far to ride (i.e. the extensive margin). To the extent that these two choices are related and, moreover, potentially infl uenced by factors unobservable to the researcher, we explore alternative estimators using twostage censored regression techniques to assess whether the results are subject to biases from sample selectivity. A key fi nding is that while higher fuel costs are associated with an increased probability of undertaking non-recreational bike trips, this eff ect is predicated on residence in an urbanized region. We also fi nd evidence for a positive association with the extent of bike paths, both in increasing the probability of nonrecreational bike travel as well as the distance traveled.

Suggested Citation

  • Frondel, Manuel & Vance, Colin, 2016. "Cycling on the extensive and intensive margin: The role of paths and prices," Ruhr Economic Papers 627, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:rwirep:627
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    Cited by:

    1. Kwiatkowski Michał Adam, 2018. "Urban Cycling as an Indicator of Socio-Economic Innovation and Sustainable Transport," Quaestiones Geographicae, Sciendo, vol. 37(4), pages 23-32, December.
    2. Liangpeng Gao & Yanjie Ji & Xingchen Yan & Yao Fan & Weihong Guo, 2021. "Incentive measures to avoid the illegal parking of dockless shared bikes: the relationships among incentive forms, intensity and policy compliance," Transportation, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 1033-1060, April.
    3. Agnieszka Jaszczak & Agnieszka Morawiak & Joanna Żukowska, 2020. "Cycling as a Sustainable Transport Alternative in Polish Cittaslow Towns," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(12), pages 1-23, June.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    bicycle paths; fuel prices; non-recreational cycling;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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