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30 Years of Schengen: Internal blessing, external curse?

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Listed:
  • Ademmer, Esther
  • Barsbai, Toman
  • Lücke, Matthias
  • Stöhr, Tobias

Abstract

We take stock of the Schengen Agreement that celebrated its 30th birthday on June 14th, 2015. We argue that the abolition of internal border controls in most European Union member states is rightly considered a blessing to EU citizens. Internally, the Agreement facilitates social and economic interactions without impeding the security of EU citizens. Externally, the Schengen Agreement has also helped to spread liberal norms and promote EU policies across EU borders, whenever Schengen borders prove permeable enough to allow for legal migration or if the relaxation of Schengen visa requirements is used as a carrot to trigger reforms in EU candidate and neighboring countries. The recent humanitarian crisis at the EU borders reveals that the Schengen system still lacks an appropriate joint asylum policy to counterbalance the loss of internal border controls. This weakness may undermine one of the main achievements of European integration. This Policy Brief revisits the accomplishments of 30 years of Schengen. We first ask how Schengen has affected member states and their citizens and which effects it has exerted on non-Schengen states outside of the EU's borders. We subsequently elaborate on appropriate reforms of a communitarized asylum policy that is needed to safeguard the accomplishments of the Schengen Agreement in the future.

Suggested Citation

  • Ademmer, Esther & Barsbai, Toman & Lücke, Matthias & Stöhr, Tobias, 2015. "30 Years of Schengen: Internal blessing, external curse?," Kiel Policy Brief 88, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:ifwkpb:88
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:brv:journl:v:15:y:2017:i:4:p:407-434 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Angela Parenti & Cristina Tealdi, 2017. "Does the abolition of border controls boost cross-border commuting? Evidence from Switzerland," Discussion Papers 2017/213, Dipartimento di Economia e Management (DEM), University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    3. repec:brv:journl:v:15:y:2017:i:4:p:344-357 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Stehn, Jürgen, 2017. "Das Kern-Problem der EU," Kiel Policy Brief 106, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    5. Gabriel Felbermayr & Jasmin Katrin Gröschl & Thomas Steinwachs, 2016. "Handelseffekte von Grenzkontrollen," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 69(05), pages 18-27, March.
    6. repec:brv:journl:v:15:y:2017:i:4:p:358-370 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. repec:brv:journl:v:15:y:2017:i:4:p:390-406 is not listed on IDEAS

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