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The characteristics and determinants of FDI in Ghana

Author

Listed:
  • Barthel, Fabian
  • Busse, Matthias
  • Osei, Robert

Abstract

Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) can be a valuable tool for development. However, not all forms of FDI are equally beneficial for the host country. The paper analyses the characteristics and determinants of FDI in a typical developing country: Ghana. Moreover, key policy areas are indicated, in order to enable Ghana both to attract more FDI and to increase the benefits from these capital inflows. The analysis combines qualitative and quantitative methods and is partly based on data retrieved from the World Bank's 2007 Enterprise Survey, and partly on our own survey of 54 multinational enterprises operating in Ghana.

Suggested Citation

  • Barthel, Fabian & Busse, Matthias & Osei, Robert, 2008. "The characteristics and determinants of FDI in Ghana," HWWI Research Papers 2-15, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:hwwirp:2-15
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Elhanan Helpman, 2006. "Trade, FDI, and the Organization of Firms," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 44(3), pages 589-630, September.
    2. James R. Markusen, 2004. "Multinational Firms and the Theory of International Trade," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262633078, January.
    3. Theodore H. Moran & Edward M. Graham & Magnus Blomstrom, 2005. "Does Foreign Direct Investment Promote Development?," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 3810.
    4. Carsten Eckel, 2003. "Fragmentation, Efficiency-Seeking FDI, and Employment," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(2), pages 317-331, May.
    5. Caves,Richard E., 2007. "Multinational Enterprise and Economic Analysis," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521677530, March.
    6. Asiedu, Elizabeth, 2002. "On the Determinants of Foreign Direct Investment to Developing Countries: Is Africa Different?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 107-119, January.
    7. Caves,Richard E., 2007. "Multinational Enterprise and Economic Analysis," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521860130, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:touman:v:54:y:2016:i:c:p:1-12 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Osei, Robert, 2012. "Aid, Growth and Private Capital Flows to Ghana," WIDER Working Paper Series 022, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Cantah, William Godfred & Wiafe, Emmanuel Agyapong & Adams, Abass, 2013. "Foreign direct investment and trade policy openness in Sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 58074, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Daniel S.Hain & Roman Jurowetzki, 2015. "Silicon Savanna? Local Competence Building and International Venture Capital in Low Income Countries. The Emergence of Foreign High-Tech Investments in Kenya," Globelics Working Paper Series 2015-09, Globelics - Global Network for Economics of Learning, Innovation, and Competence Building Systems, Aalborg University, Department of Business and Management.
    5. repec:unu:wpaper:wp2012-22 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Holger Görg & Adnan Seric, 2016. "Linkages with Multinationals and Domestic Firm Performance: The Role of Assistance for Local Firms," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 28(4), pages 605-624, September.
    7. Shashidhara Kolavalli & Elizabeth Robinson & Guyslain Ngeleza & Felix Asante, 2012. "Economic Transformation in Ghana: Where Will the Path Lead?," Journal of African Development, African Finance and Economic Association, vol. 14(2), pages 41-78.
    8. Sotiris Blanas & Adnan Seric & Christian Viegelahn, 2017. "Jobs, FDI and Institutions in Sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Firm-Level Data," Working Papers 152465485, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    9. repec:pal:easeco:v:44:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1057_eej.2016.9 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Maktoba Omar & Collins Osei, 2015. "An investigative analysis of the factors influencing degree of involvement in a foreign market," Transnational Marketing Journal, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 3(1), pages 45-60, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Foreign Direct Investment; Multinational Enterprises; Ghana;

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa

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