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Spatial structural change - evidence and prospects


  • Bade, Franz-Josef
  • Niebuhr, Annekatrin
  • Schönert, Matthias


Main topics of the following analysis are the development of spatial structure and the question whether the economic disparities between agglomerations and peripheral areas will con- or diverge. Frequently, economic disparities are measured by per capita i ncome. Because of the relationship between income growth and employment change, a separate analysis of both quantitative components seems to be more appropriate. Fu rthermore, to reduce the uncertainty concerning the future development of regional di sparities human capital - owing to its decisive importance for economic and technolog ical competitiveness - is considered as well. Consequently this study of regional disparities is based on the analysis of time-series for several indicators from 1976 to 1996. Due to this long period the data is constrained to the old FRG. The central tendencies of sp atial structural change - on the one side (relative) gains of urban fringe and peripheral areas, on the other side (relative) losses of agglomerations and their centres - prove to be extremely stable for all indicators on the level of spatial categories. T he stability of spatial structural change suggests that the deconcentration process will continue in the near future.

Suggested Citation

  • Bade, Franz-Josef & Niebuhr, Annekatrin & Schönert, Matthias, 2000. "Spatial structural change - evidence and prospects," HWWA Discussion Papers 87, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:hwwadp:26157

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Stephanie Jasmand & Wolfgang Maennig, 2007. "Regional Income and Employment Effects of the 1972 Munich Olympic Summer Games," Working Papers 007, Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg.
    2. Laaser, Claus-Friedrich & Soltwedel, Rüdiger, 2002. "Internet, adjustment of firms and the spatial division of labour," ERSA conference papers ersa02p520, European Regional Science Association.
    3. Davies, Sara & Hallet, Martin, 2002. "Interactions between national and regional development," HWWA Discussion Papers 207, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure


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