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Regional Income and Employment Effects of the 1972 Munich Olympic Summer Games

  • Stephanie Jasmand
  • Wolfgang Maennig


    (University of Hamburg)

Olympic Games may have impacts on income and employment in the host city, but no ex post study has been carried out for European Olympic host cities to date. The present study closes this gap using the 1972 Munich Olympic Games. The data period examined in this study allows for analysis of long-term effects. In addition, the methodology avoids overestimating the significance of the effects. Finally, we report results for all possible combinations of pre- and post-Olympic periods. The results: income in Olympic regions grew significantly faster than in other German regions. In contrast, no employment effects were identified.

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Paper provided by International Association of Sports Economists & North American Association of Sports Economists in its series Working Papers with number 0712.

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Length: 25 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:spe:wpaper:0712
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  1. David Card & Alan Krueger, 1993. "Minimum Wages and Employment: A Case Study of the Fast Food Industry in New Jersey and Pennsylvania," Working Papers 694, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  2. Bade, Franz-Josef & Niebuhr, Annekatrin & Schönert, Matthias, 2000. "Spatial structural change - evidence and prospects," HWWA Discussion Papers 87, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
  3. Dennis Coates & Brad R. Humphreys, 2003. "Professional Sports Facilities, Franchises and Urban Economic Development," UMBC Economics Department Working Papers 03-103, UMBC Department of Economics.
  4. Marianne Bertrand & Esther Duflo & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2002. "How Much Should We Trust Differences-in-Differences Estimates?," NBER Working Papers 8841, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Robert Baade & Victor Matheson, 2000. "Bidding for the Olympics: Fools Gold?," IASE Conference Papers 0007, International Association of Sports Economists.
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