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Measuring Chronic Non-Income Poverty


  • Klasen, Stephan
  • Günther, Isabel


An increasing interest in poverty dynamics has lately also led to an extensive literature on the analysis of chronic poverty. Based on Amartya Sen?s groundbreaking work on capabilities and functionings static poverty measures have long used non-income indicators. In contrast, measures of poverty dynamics - including chronic poverty – have in general conceptualised poverty only in an income dimension. Hence, this paper first critically discusses the conceptual and empirical potentials and limitations of analysing chronic poverty from a nonincome perspective. Second, it proposes methods to empirically measure chronic nonincome poverty, with an exploratory application to panel data from Vietnam from 1992 and 1997, which demonstrates that a range of useful insights can be generated from such an analysis. In particular, we find that the correlation between chronic income and non-income poverty is rather low which is mostly due to a low correlation between income and nonincome poverty in each period, while both move relatively closely over time. We also find a surprising amount of heterogeneity in static and dynamic non-income poverty within households.

Suggested Citation

  • Klasen, Stephan & Günther, Isabel, 2007. "Measuring Chronic Non-Income Poverty," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Göttingen 2007 10, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:gdec07:6533

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Klasen, Stephan, 2008. "Economic Growth and Poverty Reduction: Measurement Issues using Income and Non-Income Indicators," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 420-445, March.
    2. Perge, Emilie & McKay, Andy, 2016. "Forest clearing, livelihood strategies and welfare: Evidence from the Tsimane' in Bolivia," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 112-124.
    3. Komsan Suriya, 2012. "Modeling the linkage between tourism and multiple dimensions of poverty in Thailand," The Empirical Econometrics and Quantitative Economics Letters, Faculty of Economics, Chiang Mai University, vol. 1(1), pages 17-38, March.
    4. Adriana Cardozo & Melanie Grosse, 2009. "Pro-Poor Growth Using Non-Income Indicators: An Empirical Illustration for Colombia," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 9, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    5. Naude, Wim & McGillivray, Mark & Rossouw, Stephanie, 2008. "Measuring the Vulnerability of Subnational Regions," WIDER Working Paper Series 054, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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