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Social health insurance: The major driver of unsustainable fiscal policy?

  • Hagist, Christian
  • Klusen, Norbert
  • Plate, Andreas
  • Raffelhüschen, Bernd
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    During the next decades the populations of most developed countries will grow older as a result of the low level of birth rates since the 1970s and/or the continuously increasing life expectancy. We show within a Generational Accounting framework how unsustainable the public finances of France, Germany, Switzerland and the U.S. are, given their demographic developments. Thereby, our focus lies on social health insurance systems which are in addition affected by the medical-technical progress. Due to the cost-increasing effect of the medical-technical progress one can justifiably say that social health insurance schemes are the major drivers behind unsustainable fiscal policies.

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    File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/46212/1/662495292.pdf
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    Paper provided by Research Center for Generational Contracts (FZG), University of Freiburg in its series FZG Discussion Papers with number 1.

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    Date of creation: 2005
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    Handle: RePEc:zbw:fzgdps:1
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    1. Okunade, Albert A. & Murthy, Vasudeva N. R., 2002. "Technology as a 'major driver' of health care costs: a cointegration analysis of the Newhouse conjecture," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 147-159, January.
    2. Alan J. Auerbach & Jagadeesh Gokhale & Laurence J. Kotlikoff, 1991. "Generational accounts: a meaningful alternative to deficit accounting," Working Paper 9103, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    3. Jennifer Roberts, 1999. "Sensitivity of elasticity estimates for OECD health care spending: analysis of a dynamic heterogeneous data field," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(5), pages 459-472.
    4. Kamke, Kerstin, 1998. "The German health care system and health care reform," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 171-194, February.
    5. Alan J. Auerbach & Jagadeesh Gokhale & Laurence J. Kotlikoff, 1994. "Generational Accounting: A Meaningful Way to Evaluate Fiscal Policy," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 8(1), pages 73-94, Winter.
    6. Fehr, Hans & Kotlikoff, Laurence J., 1995. "Generational accounting in general equilibrium," Tübinger Diskussionsbeiträge 47, University of Tübingen, School of Business and Economics.
    7. Joseph P. Newhouse, 1992. "Medical Care Costs: How Much Welfare Loss?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 6(3), pages 3-21, Summer.
    8. Carole Bonnet, 2002. "Comptabilité générationnelle appliquée à la France : quelques facteurs d'instabilité des résultats," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 154(3), pages 59-78.
    9. Friedrich Breyer & Volker Ulrich, 2000. "Gesundheitsausgaben, Alter und medizinischer Fortschritt: Eine Regressionsanalyse," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Department of Statistics and Economics, vol. 220(1), pages 1-17.
    10. Hagist, Christian & Fetzer, Stefan, 2004. "GMG, Kopfpauschalen und Bürgerversicherungen: Der aktuelle Reformstand und seine intergenerativen Verteilungswirkungen," Discussion Papers 114, Institut für Finanzwissenschaft, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg.
    11. Jagadeesh Gokhale & Kent Smetters, 2003. "Fiscal and generational imbalances: new budget measures for new budget priorities," Policy Discussion Papers, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue Dec.
    12. Stefan Fetzer & Christian Hagist, 2004. "GMG, Kopfpauschalen und Bürgerversicherungen: Der aktuelle Reformstand und seine intergenerativen Verteilungswirkungen," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 124(3), pages 387-420.
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