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Epidemic corruption: a bio-economic homology

  • Hathroubi, Salem

This paper aims to study corruption as an epidemic phenomenon using the epidemic diffusion model of Kermack and Mc-Kendrick (1927). We seek to determine the dynamics of corruption and its impact on the composition of the population at a given time. We determine a threshold epidemiological corruption based on the approximation of the honest population.

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Paper provided by ZBW - German National Library of Economics in its series EconStor Preprints with number 73558.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:esprep:73558
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  1. Era Dabla-Norris, 2000. "A Game-Theoretic Analysis of Corruption in Bureaucracies," IMF Working Papers 00/106, International Monetary Fund.
  2. Iwasaki, Ichiro & Suzuki, Taku, 2012. "The determinants of corruption in transition economies," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 114(1), pages 54-60.
  3. Abhijit Banerjee & Sendhil Mullainathan & Rema Hanna, 2012. "Corruption," NBER Working Papers 17968, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    • Abhijit Banerjee & Rema Hanna, 2012. "Corruption," Introductory Chapters, in: Sendhil Mullainathan & Robert Gibbons & John Roberts (ed.), The Handbook of Organizational Economics Princeton University Press.
    • Hanna, Rema N. & Mullainathan, Sendhil & Banerjee, Abhijit, 2012. "Corruption," Scholarly Articles 8830779, Harvard Kennedy School of Government.
    • Abhijit Banerjee & Rema Hanna & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2012. "Corruption," Working Papers id:4952, eSocialSciences.
    • Banerjee, Abhijit & Hanna, Rema & Mullainathan, Sendhil, 2012. "Corruption," Working Paper Series rwp12-023, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  4. Caulkins, Jonathan P. & Feichtinger, Gustav & Grass, Dieter & Hartl, Richard F. & Kort, Peter M. & Novak, Andreas J. & Seidl, Andrea, 2013. "Leading bureaucracies to the tipping point: An alternative model of multiple stable equilibrium levels of corruption," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 225(3), pages 541-546.
  5. Rose-Ackerman, Susan, 1975. "The economics of corruption," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 187-203, February.
  6. Becker, Sascha & Egger, Peter H & Seidel, Tobias, 2008. "Corruption Epidemics," Stirling Economics Discussion Papers 2008-09, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
  7. Macrae, John, 1982. "Underdevelopment and the economics of corruption: A game theory approach," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 10(8), pages 677-687, August.
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