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Stable and Efficient Networks with Farsighted Players: the Largest Consistent Set

  • A Bhattacharya

In this paper we study strategic formation of bilateral networks with farsighted players in the classic framework of Jackson and Wolinsky (1996). We use the largest consistent set (LCS)(Chwe (1994)) as the solution concept for stability. We show that there exists a value function such that for every component balanced and anonymous allocation rule, the corresponding LCS does not contain any strongly efficient network. Using Pareto efficiency, a weaker concept of efficiency, we get a more positive result. However, then also, at least one environment of networks (with a component balanced and anonymous allocation rule) exists for which the largest consistent set does not contain any Pareto efficient network. These confirm that the well-known problem of the incompatibility between the set of stable networks and the set of efficient networks persists even in the environment with farsighted players. Next we study some possibilities of resolving this incompatibility.

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Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of York in its series Discussion Papers with number 09/34.

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Handle: RePEc:yor:yorken:09/34
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  1. Herings P. Jean-Jacques & Mauleon Ana & Vannetelbosch Vincent, 2006. "Farsightedly Stable Networks," Research Memorandum 041, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
  2. Gilles Grandjean & Ana Mauleon & Vincent Vannetelbosch, 2011. "Connections Among Farsighted Agents," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 13(6), pages 935-955, December.
  3. Matthew O. Jackson & Asher Wolinsky, 1994. "A Strategic Model of Social and Economic Networks," Discussion Papers 1098, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  4. Dutta, Bhaskar & Mutuswami, Suresh, 1996. "Stable Networks," Working Papers 971, California Institute of Technology, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences.
  5. Frank Page & Myrna Wooders, 2007. "Strategic Basins of Attraction, the Path Dominance Core, and Network Formation Games," Caepr Working Papers 2007-020, Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Economics Department, Indiana University Bloomington.
  6. Jackson, Matthew O. & van den Nouweland, Anne, 2002. "Strongly Stable Networks," Working Papers 1147, California Institute of Technology, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences.
  7. Bloch, Francis & Dutta, Bhaskar, 2009. "Communication networks with endogenous link strength," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 39-56, May.
  8. Masuda, Takeshi, 2002. "Farsighted stability in average return games," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 169-181, November.
  9. Dutta, Bhaskar & Ghosal, Sayantan & Ray, Debraj, 2005. "Farsighted network formation," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 122(2), pages 143-164, June.
  10. Akihiro Suzuki & Shigeo Muto, 2005. "Farsighted Stability in an n-Person Prisoner’s Dilemma," International Journal of Game Theory, Springer, vol. 33(3), pages 431-445, 09.
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