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Sources of Productivity Slowdown in European Countries During 1990s

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  • Enrico Saltari
  • Giuseppe Travaglini

Abstract

In this paper we address the question whether the shift in labour supply curve is the only fundamental change capturing the negative correlation between the growth rates of productivity and employment in European countries in the last fifteen years. If this explanation is correct then the labour demand curve did not shift in recent times, keeping other features of the production function unchanged. This is obviously a problem of identification. Thus, in this study we provide some empirical evidence explaining the shifts in labour demand curve over the same period. Our main conclusion is that the sluggish performance of the European economy in the last fifteen years has a common root in the large changes occurred in the labour market. We refer to these changes as technological and non technological shocks. In our model, adverse technological shocks shift the labour demand curve, while positive non technological shocks shift the labour supply curve. These two shifts contribute simultaneously to rise employment and to decrease the growth rate of productivity. Our evidence shows that labour productivity does respond positively to labour demand (technological) shocks and negatively to labour supply (non technological) shocks. Hence, the main result of our study is that both shocks are necessary to provide a complete picture of the employment-productivity trade-off in European countries during the last fifteen years.

Suggested Citation

  • Enrico Saltari & Giuseppe Travaglini, 2007. "Sources of Productivity Slowdown in European Countries During 1990s," Discussion Papers 07/24, Department of Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:yor:yorken:07/24
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Enrico Saltari & Giuseppe Travaglini, 2008. "Il rallentamento della produttività del lavoro e la crescita dell'occupazione. Il ruolo del progresso tecnologico e della flessibilità del lavoro," Rivista italiana degli economisti, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 1, pages 3-38.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Productivity slowdown; labour market; SVAR;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General
    • E29 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Other

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