IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Bias in Measuring Smoking Behavior

  • Vidhura Tennekoon
  • Robert Rosenman

    ()

    (School of Economic Sciences, Washington State University)

Researchers often use the discrepancy between the self-reported and biochemically assessed active smoking status to argue that self-reported smoking status is not reliable, ignoring the limitations of biochemically assessed measures and treating it as the gold standard in their comparisons. Here, we employ recent advances in econometric techniques to compare self-reported and biochemically assessed smoking data taking into account errors with both methods. Our results suggest that biochemical measures may not always be more reliable than self-reported data.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://faculty.ses.wsu.edu/WorkingPapers/rosenman/WP2013-10.pdf
File Function: First version, 2013
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by School of Economic Sciences, Washington State University in its series Working Papers with number 2013-10.

as
in new window

Length: 21 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wsu:wpaper:rosenman-15
Contact details of provider: Postal: PO Box 646210, Pullman, WA 99164-646210
Phone: 509-335-5555
Fax: 509-335-1173
Web page: http://faculty.ses.wsu.edu/

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
  2. Hausman, J. A. & Abrevaya, Jason & Scott-Morton, F. M., 1998. "Misclassification of the dependent variable in a discrete-response setting," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(2), pages 239-269, September.
  3. M. Christopher Auld, 2005. "Smoking, Drinking, and Income," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(2).
  4. Irina B. Grafova & Frank P. Stafford, 2009. "The Wage Effects of Personal Smoking History," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 62(3), pages 381-393, April.
  5. Vidhura Tennekoon & Robert Rosenman, 2011. "Systematically Misclassified Binary Dependant Variables," Working Papers 2011-9, School of Economic Sciences, Washington State University.
  6. van Ours, Jan C., 2004. "A pint a day raises a man's pay; but smoking blows that gain away," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 863-886, September.
  7. Phillip B. Levine & Tara Gustafson & Ann D. Velenchik, 1997. "More bad news for smokers? The effects of cigarette smoking on wages," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 50(3), pages 493-509, April.
  8. van Ours, J.C., 2004. "A pint a day raises a man's pay, but smoking blows that gain away," Other publications TiSEM 1447748f-5e9e-4064-84f2-1, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
  9. Cowan, Benjamin & Schwab, Benjamin, 2011. "The incidence of the healthcare costs of smoking," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 1094-1102.
  10. repec:ner:tilbur:urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-140957 is not listed on IDEAS
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wsu:wpaper:rosenman-15. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Danielle Engelhardt)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.