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Intercity Trade and the Industrial Diversification of Cities

Author

Listed:
  • Alex Anas

    (State University of New York at Buffalo)

  • Kai Xiong

    (The Chase Manhattan Bank)

Abstract

The industrial diversification of cities is explained without imposing linkages among industries. In each of two city-industries, a manufacture is produced competitively as the final good using labor and industry- specific differentiated services. Manufacturers import the services of their industry from all cities that produce them, since their technology favors variety. In specialized cities, the city-industry is large and many services are locally available but the two manufactures have to be traded among cities. In diversified cities the two manufactures are produced in the same city, and each industry crowds out half the local services of the other, but manufactures need not be imported. A lower cost of trading manufactures (e.g. railroads and intercity highways) favors a system of specialized cities, while a lower cost of trading services (e.g. telephone, the Internet) favors a system of diversified cities since the latter cities rely more on imported services, having fewer locally. A larger cost-share of services favors specialization, and high intracity commuting cost and population growth favor diversification.

Suggested Citation

  • Alex Anas & Kai Xiong, 2003. "Intercity Trade and the Industrial Diversification of Cities," Urban/Regional 0302003, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpur:0302003 Note: Type of Document -
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    File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/urb/papers/0302/0302003.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Berliant, Marcus & Yu, Chia-Ming, 2013. "Rational expectations in urban economics," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 197-208.
    2. Ho Yeon KIM & Petra de Jong & Jan Rouwendal & Aleid Brouwer, 2012. "Shrinking population and the urban hierarchy
      [Housing preferences and attribute importance among Dutch older adults: a conjoint choice experiment]
      ," ERSA conference papers ersa12p350, European Regional Science Association.
    3. Ioannides, Yannis M., 2015. "Neighborhoods to nations via social interactions," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 5-15.
    4. Sorek, Gilad, 2009. "Migration costs, commuting costs and intercity population sorting," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(4), pages 377-385, July.
    5. Massimo Del Gatto, 2004. "Agglomeration, Integration, and Territorial Authority Scale in a System of Trading Cities. Centralisation versus Devolution," Working Papers 2004.93, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    6. Berliant, Marcus & Wang, Ping, 2008. "Urban growth and subcenter formation: A trolley ride from the Staples Center to Disneyland and the Rose Bowl," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 679-693, March.
    7. Alex Anas, 2004. "Vanishing cities: what does the new economic geography imply about the efficiency of urbanization?," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(2), pages 181-199, April.
    8. Da Silva Catela, Eva Yamila & Porcile, Gabriel & Gonçalves, Flávio, 2010. "Brazilian municipalities: agglomeration economies and development levels in 1997 and 2007," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), August.
    9. Kim, Ho Yeon, 2012. "Shrinking population and the urban hierarchy," IDE Discussion Papers 360, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    10. Anas, Alex & Xiong, Kai, 2005. "The formation and growth of specialized cities: efficiency without developers or Malthusian traps," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 445-470, July.
    11. Yannis M. Ioannides, 2008. "Intercity Trade and Convergent versus Divergent Urban Growth," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0723, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
    12. Hajime Takatsuka & Dao-Zhi Zeng, 2013. "Industrial configuration in an economy with low transportation costs," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 51(2), pages 593-620, October.
    13. Simon Firestone, 2010. "Diverse cities and knowledge spillovers," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 44(1), pages 1-20, February.
    14. Diaz-Lanchas, Jorge & Llano, Carlos & Zofío, José Luis, 2013. "Trade margins, transport cost thresholds and market areas: Municipal freight flows and urban hierarchy," Working Papers in Economic Theory 2013/10, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain), Department of Economic Analysis (Economic Theory and Economic History).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Trade; diversification; specialization; city systems;

    JEL classification:

    • R - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics

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