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Family Health Benefits and Worker Turnover

  • Dan A. Black

    (University of Kentucky)

In this paper, I examine the impact of employer-provided health benefits on job turnover. Because many employer-provided plans extend coverage to a worker's entire family, the value of an employer's employment offer to a worker depends on whether the worker's spouse provides the family with health benefits. If a worker's spouse has an employer-provided health insurance for their family, the worker will value employment offers with and without health insurance benefits differently than a worker whose spouse does not have employer-provided health benefits. Importantly, this distortion arises from the reliance on employer-provided benefits and is independent of any pre-existing conditions clauses or issues concerning the portability of health plans. The estimates suggest that spouse-provided benefits substantially increase the likelihood of turnover.

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Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Labor and Demography with number 9604001.

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Date of creation: 01 Apr 1996
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Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpla:9604001
Note: Type of Document - Binary Word for Windows (V.6) Document; prepared on IBM PC - compatible; to print on HP LaserJet IIIP (PCL);
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  1. Gruber, J. & Madrian, B.C., 1994. "Limited Insurance Portability and Job Mobility: The Effects of Public Policy on Job-Lock," Working papers 94-03, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  2. Hutchens, Robert, 1986. "Delayed Payment Contracts and a Firm's Propensity to Hire Older Workers," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(4), pages 439-57, October.
  3. Jonathan Gruber & Alan Krueger, 1990. "The Incidence of Mandated Employer-Provided Insurance: Lessons from Workers' Compensations Insurance," Working Papers 659, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  4. Ippolito, Richard A, 1985. "The Labor Contract and True Economic Pension Liabilities," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(5), pages 1031-43, December.
  5. Rebecca A. Luzadis & Olivia S. Mitchell, 1991. "Explaining Pension Dynamics," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(4), pages 679-703.
  6. Alan C. Monheit & Philip F. Cooper, 1994. "Health insurance and job mobility: Theory and evidence," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(1), pages 68-85, October.
  7. Diamond, Peter, 1992. "Organizing the Health Insurance Market," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(6), pages 1233-54, November.
  8. Mortensen, Dale T, 1988. "Wages, Separations, and Job Tenure: On-the-Job Specific Training or Matching?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(4), pages 445-71, October.
  9. Douglas Holtz-Eakin, 1994. "Health Insurance Provision and Labor Market Efficiency in the United States and Germany," NBER Chapters, in: Social Protection versus Economic Flexibility: Is There a Trade-Off?, pages 157-188 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Frank A. Scott & Mark C. Berger & Dan A. Black, 1989. "Effects of the tax treatment of fringe benefits on labor market segmentation," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 42(2), pages 216-229, January.
  11. Stephen A. Woodbury & Wei-Jang Huang, 1991. "The Tax Treatment of Fringe Benefits," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number ttfb, March.
  12. Long, James E & Scott, Frank A, 1982. "The Income Tax and Nonwage Compensation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 64(2), pages 211-19, May.
  13. Woodbury, Stephen A, 1983. "Substitution between Wage and Nonwage Benefits," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(1), pages 166-82, March.
  14. Gruber, Jonathan, 1994. "The Incidence of Mandated Maternity Benefits," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(3), pages 622-41, June.
  15. Madrian, Brigitte C, 1994. "Employment-Based Health Insurance and Job Mobility: Is There Evidence of Job-Lock?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 109(1), pages 27-54, February.
  16. Steven G. Allen & Robert L. Clark & Ann A. McDermed, 1993. "Pensions, Bonding, and Lifetime Jobs," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(3), pages 463-481.
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