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Does Centralised Wage Setting Lead into Higher Taxation

  • Juha Kilponen

    (Bank of Finland)

  • Pekka Sinko

    (Prime Minister's Office)

This paper studies implications of centralised wage setting for the level of taxation and public expenditure in an analytical model with unionised labour markets. We extend the previous studies by allowing for both demand and supply effects of labour. Also, in addition to the standard social planner approach, we consider a political economy set up, where the tax rate is chosen to maximise the welfare of a median voter. Our results suggest that when working hours are endogenous, the relationship between the degree of centralisation and the labour tax rate is ambiguous. In particular, if the marginal utility from public provision is sufficiently low, centralised wage setting implies lower optimal tax rate on labour. This is due to a 'budgetary discipline effect', which reduces the optimal tax rate preferred by the median voter under centralised wage setting.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/lab/papers/0509/0509013.pdf
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Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Labor and Demography with number 0509013.

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Length: 25 pages
Date of creation: 30 Sep 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpla:0509013
Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 25
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://128.118.178.162

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  1. Summers, Lawrence H & Gruber, Jonathan & Vergara, Rodrigo, 1993. "Taxation and the Structure of Labor Markets: The Case of Corporatism," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 108(2), pages 385-411, May.
  2. Pekka Sinko, 1999. "Taxation, Employment and the Environment - General Equilibrium Analysis with Unionised Labour Markets," Research Reports 54, Government Institute for Economic Research Finland (VATT).
  3. Driffill, John & van der Ploeg, Frederick, 1993. "Monopoly Unions and the Liberalisation of International Trade," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 103(417), pages 379-85, March.
  4. Pekka Sinko & Juha Kilponen, 2001. "Labour Taxation and the Degree of Centralisation in a Trade Union Model with Endogenous Labour Supply," Discussion Papers 250, Government Institute for Economic Research Finland (VATT).
  5. Francesco Daveri & Guido Tabellini, 2000. "Unemployment, growth and taxation in industrial countries," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 15(30), pages 47-104, 04.
  6. Koskela, Erkki & Schob, Ronnie, 1999. "Alleviating unemployment:: The case for green tax reforms," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(9), pages 1723-1746, October.
  7. Jaakko Kiander & Juha Kilponen & Jouko Vilmunen, 2000. "Taxes, Growth and Unemployment in the OECD Countries - Does Collective Bargaininig Matter?," Discussion Papers 235, Government Institute for Economic Research Finland (VATT).
  8. Daniele Checchi & Claudio Lucifora, 2002. "Unions and labour market institutions in Europe," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 17(35), pages 361-408, October.
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