IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Estimating the probability of large negative stock market


  • Philip Kostov

    (Queen's University Belfast)

  • Seamus McErlean

    (Queen's University Belfast)


Correct assessment of the risks associated with likely economic outcomes is vital for effective decision making. The objective of investment in the stock market is to obtain positive market returns. The risk, however, is the danger of suffering large negative market returns. A variety of parametric models can be used in assessing this type of risk. A major disadvantage of these techniques is that they require a specific assumption to be made about the nature of the statistical distribution. Projections based on this method are conditional on the validity of this underlying assumption, which itself is not testable. An alternative approach is to use a non-parametric methodology, based on the statistical extreme value theory, which provides a means for evaluating the unconditional distribution (or at least the tails of this distribution) beyond the historically observed values. The methodology involves the calculation of the tail index, which is used to estimate the relevant exceedence probabilities (for different critical levels of loss) for a selection of food industry companies. Information about these downside risks is critically important for investment decision making. In addition, the tail index estimates permit examination of the stable Paretian hypothesis.

Suggested Citation

  • Philip Kostov & Seamus McErlean, 2004. "Estimating the probability of large negative stock market," Finance 0409011, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpfi:0409011
    Note: Type of Document - pdf

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Allan Timmermann & Halbert White & Ryan Sullivan, 1998. "The Dangers of Data-Driven Inference: The Case of Calendar Effects in Stock Returns," FMG Discussion Papers dp304, Financial Markets Group.
    2. S. James Press, 1967. "A Compound Events Model for Security Prices," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 40, pages 317-317.
    3. Huisman, Ronald, et al, 2001. "Tail-Index Estimates in Small Samples," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 19(2), pages 208-216, April.
    4. Longin, Francois M, 1996. "The Asymptotic Distribution of Extreme Stock Market Returns," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 69(3), pages 383-408, July.
    5. J. Huston McCulloch, 1978. "Interest Rate Risk and Capital Adequacy For Traditional Banks and Financial Intermediaries," NBER Working Papers 0237, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Benoit Mandelbrot, 2015. "The Variation of Certain Speculative Prices," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: THE WORLD SCIENTIFIC HANDBOOK OF FUTURES MARKETS, chapter 3, pages 39-78 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    7. Sullivan, Ryan & Timmermann, Allan & White, Halbert, 1998. "Dangers of Data-Driven Inference: The Case of Calendar Effects in Stock Returns," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt2z02z6d9, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C10 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - General
    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • Q19 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Other

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpfi:0409011. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (EconWPA). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.