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Women, Microfinance, and Savings: Lessons and Proposals

Author

Listed:
  • Rebecca Vonderlack

    (Washington University in St. Louis)

  • Mark Schreiner

    (Washington University in St. Louis)

Abstract

Microfinance—both credit and savings—has potential to improve the well- being of poor women in developing countries. This paper explores practical ways to achieve that potential. Based on lessons from informal saving mechanisms that women already use, the paper proposes two savings services designed to address the development issues that confront women. The proposals call for safe-deposit boxes and for matched savings accounts for health care or education.

Suggested Citation

  • Rebecca Vonderlack & Mark Schreiner, 2001. "Women, Microfinance, and Savings: Lessons and Proposals," Development and Comp Systems 0108004, EconWPA, revised 27 Dec 2001.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0108004
    Note: Type of Document - Adobe Acrobat 3.0; prepared on Windows 98; to print on Adobe Acrobat 3.0; pages: 25; figures: Included in pdf file
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    File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/dev/papers/0108/0108004.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sondra Beverly & Amanda Moore & Mark Schreiner, 2001. "A Framework of Asset-Accumulation Stages and Strategies," Development and Comp Systems 0109004, EconWPA.
    2. Kabeer, Naila, 2001. "Conflicts Over Credit: Re-Evaluating the Empowerment Potential of Loans to Women in Rural Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 63-84, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. R. Casselman & Linda Sama & Abraham Stefanidis, 2015. "Differential Social Performance of Religiously-Affiliated Microfinance Institutions (MFIs) in Base of Pyramid (BoP) Markets," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 132(3), pages 539-552, December.
    2. P.C. Ike & D.E. Umuedafe, 2013. "Determinants of Savings and Capital Formation among Rural Farmers in Isoko North Local Government Area of Delta State, Nigeria," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 3(10), pages 1289-1297, October.
    3. Matteo Marinangeli & Andrea Filippo Presbitero, 2011. "Can the Poor Save More? Evidence from Bangladesh," Mo.Fi.R. Working Papers 57, Money and Finance Research group (Mo.Fi.R.) - Univ. Politecnica Marche - Dept. Economic and Social Sciences.
    4. Estrin, Saul & Mickiewicz, Tomasz, 2009. "Do Institutions Have a Greater Effect on Female Entrepreneurs?," IZA Discussion Papers 4577, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Juanah, Momoh, 2005. "The Role of Micro-financing in Rural Poverty Reduction in Developing Countries," Wismar Discussion Papers 18/2005, Hochschule Wismar, Wismar Business School.
    6. Tim Fry & Sandra Mihajilo & Roslyn Russell & Robert Brooks, 2008. "The Factors Influencing Saving in a Matched Savings Program: Goals, Knowledge of Payment Instruments, and Other Behavior," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 234-250, June.
    7. Sondra Beverly & Amanda Moore & Mark Schreiner, 2001. "A Framework of Asset-Accumulation Stages and Strategies," Development and Comp Systems 0109004, EconWPA.
    8. Johnson, Susan, 2004. "Gender Norms in Financial Markets: Evidence from Kenya," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(8), pages 1355-1374, August.
    9. Thorsten Beck & Haki Pamuk & Burak R. Uras, 2014. "Entrepreneurial Saving Practices and Reinvestment: Theory and Evidence from Tanzanian MSEs," CSAE Working Paper Series 2014-15, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender; development; savings incentives; Individual Development Accounts; sexism;

    JEL classification:

    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries
    • N3 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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