IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Fundamentalists Clashing over the Book: A Study of Order-Driven Stock Markets

  • Marco LiCalzi

    (Universita' di Venezia)

  • Paolo Pellizzari

    (Universita' di Venezia)

Agent-based models of market dynamics must strike a compromise between the structural assumptions that represent the trading mechanism and the behavioral assumptions that describe the rules by which traders take their decisions. We present a structurally detailed model of an order- driven stock market and show that a minimal set of behavioral assumptions suffices to generate a leptokurtic distribution of short- term log-returns. This result backs up the conjecture that the emergence of some statistical properties of financial time series is due to the microstructure of stock markets.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/comp/papers/0207/0207001.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Computational Economics with number 0207001.

as
in new window

Length: 19 pages
Date of creation: 12 Jul 2002
Date of revision: 04 Mar 2003
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpco:0207001
Note: Type of Document - pdf; prepared on Macintosh; to print on Postcript; pages: 19; figures: included
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://econwpa.repec.org

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. repec:att:wimass:9625 is not listed on IDEAS
  2. Day, Richard H. & Huang, Weihong, 1990. "Bulls, bears and market sheep," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 299-329, December.
  3. W. Brian Arthur & John H. Holland & Blake LeBaron & Richard Palmer & Paul Taylor, 1996. "Asset Pricing Under Endogenous Expectation in an Artificial Stock Market," Working Papers 96-12-093, Santa Fe Institute.
  4. J. Doyne Farmer & Shareen Joshi, 2000. "The Price Dynamics of Common Trading Strategies," Working Papers 00-12-069, Santa Fe Institute.
  5. Maslov, Sergei, 2000. "Simple model of a limit order-driven market," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 278(3), pages 571-578.
  6. Matassini, Lorenzo & Franci, Fabio, 2001. "On financial markets trading," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 289(3), pages 526-542.
  7. Welch, Ivo, 2000. "Herding among security analysts," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 369-396, December.
  8. Carl Chiarella & Giulia Iori, 2002. "A simulation analysis of the microstructure of double auction markets," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(5), pages 346-353.
  9. Cohen, Kalman J, et al, 1978. "Limit Orders, Market Structure, and the Returns Generation Process," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 33(3), pages 723-36, June.
  10. P. Bak & M. Paczuski & M. Shubik, 1996. "Price Variations in a Stock Market with Many Agents," Working Papers 96-09-075, Santa Fe Institute.
  11. Milgrom, Paul & Stokey, Nancy, 1982. "Information, trade and common knowledge," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 17-27, February.
  12. Steiglitz, Ken & Shapiro, Daniel, 1998. "Simulating the Madness of Crowds: Price Bubbles in an Auction-Mediated Robot Market," Computational Economics, Society for Computational Economics, vol. 12(1), pages 35-59, August.
  13. Lux, T. & M. Marchesi, . "Volatility Clustering in Financial Markets: A Micro-Simulation of Interacting Agents," Discussion Paper Serie B 437, University of Bonn, Germany, revised Jul 1998.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpco:0207001. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (EconWPA)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.