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The Hedonic Price Method in Real Estate and Housing Market Research: A Review of the Literature

Listed author(s):
  • Shanaka Herath

    ()

  • Gunther Maier

    ()

The Hedonic Price Method (HPM), also known as hedonic regression, is used for estimating the value of a commodity or the demand for a commodity. The HPM has been extensively used in real estate and housing market research in the recent past. In this paper, we discuss theoretical and methodological developments related to hedonic regression and undertake an examination of use of this methodology in the recent real estate and housing literature. We first define the HPM, and explain the fundamentals behind the methodology. The idea behind the HPM is that the commodities are characterized by their constitute properties, hence the value of a commodity can be calculated by adding up the estimated values of its separate properties. In the second part of the paper, we emphasise that the heterogeneous nature of real estate property justifies the use of HPM for estimating their value or demand. We also take a stock of most cited empirical studies on real estate and housing using the HPM, and classify those into several categories. The classification indicates that neighbourhood characteristics of real estate are relatively over-researched as a determinant of price or rent. It also shows that implicit value of structural characteristics is under-researched. In general, implicit value of environmental amenities in the neighbourhood and air pollution are relatively overresearched. The effect of social factors, i.e. racial segregation and crimes on real estate value is under-researched.

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File URL: http://www-sre.wu.ac.at/sre-disc/sre-disc-2010_03.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute for Multilevel Governance and Development, Department of Socioeconomics, Vienna University of Economics and Business in its series SRE-Disc with number sre-disc-2010_03.

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Length: 20 pages
Date of creation: 2010
Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwsre:sre-disc-2010_03
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Web page: http://www.wu-wien.ac.at/mlgd/

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  1. Cowling, Keith & Cubbin, John, 1972. "Hedonic Price Indexes for United Kingdom Cars," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 82(327), pages 963-978, September.
  2. Rosen, Sherwin, 1974. "Hedonic Prices and Implicit Markets: Product Differentiation in Pure Competition," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(1), pages 34-55, Jan.-Feb..
  3. Goodman, Allen C., 1998. "Andrew Court and the Invention of Hedonic Price Analysis," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 291-298, September.
  4. Brian J. L. Berry & Robert S. Bednarz, 1975. "A Hedonic Model of Prices and Assessments for Single-Family Homes: Does the Assessor Follow the Market or the Market Follow the Assessor?," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 51(1), pages 21-40.
  5. Robert C. Feenstra & Matthew D. Shapiro, 2003. "Introduction to "Scanner Data and Price Indexes"," NBER Chapters, in: Scanner Data and Price Indexes, pages 1-14 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Robert C. Feenstra & Matthew D. Shapiro, 2003. "Scanner Data and Price Indexes," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number feen03-1.
  7. Kelvin J. Lancaster, 1966. "A New Approach to Consumer Theory," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 74, pages 132-132.
  8. Bartik, Timothy J, 1987. "The Estimation of Demand Parameters in Hedonic Price Models," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(1), pages 81-88, February.
  9. Brent R. Moulton, 1996. "Bias in the Consumer Price Index: What Is the Evidence?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(4), pages 159-177, Fall.
  10. H. S. Houthakker, 1952. "Compensated Changes in Quantities and Qualities Consumed," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(3), pages 155-164.
  11. Peter F. Colwell & Gene Dilmore, 1999. "Who Was First? An Examination of an Early Hedonic Study," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 75(4), pages 620-626.
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