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Skill-Biased Share-Altering Technical Change in Spatial General Equilibrium

Author

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  • Alberto Dalmazzo

    ()

  • Antonio Accetturo
  • Guido de Blasio

Abstract

The paper consider the skill-biased "share-altering"Â technical change hypothesis in a spatial general equilibrium model where skilled and unskilled individual may exhibit different preferences for local amenities. A main novelty ""both for labour and urban economics- is that, under this hypothesis, skill-biased technical change can be readily represented by simple Cobb-Douglas production functions, rather than CES technologies. We then analyse the local labour markets equilibrium, where the adoption of new technologies may require an adequate proportion of skilled workers. Keywords: skill-biased technical change, share-altering technologies, local labour markets. JEL Classification Numbers: O33, R12, R23, J31.

Suggested Citation

  • Alberto Dalmazzo & Antonio Accetturo & Guido de Blasio, 2011. "Skill-Biased Share-Altering Technical Change in Spatial General Equilibrium," ERSA conference papers ersa11p83, European Regional Science Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa11p83
    as

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    File URL: http://www-sre.wu.ac.at/ersa/ersaconfs/ersa11/e110830aFinal00082.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Peretto, Pietro F. & Seater, John J., 2013. "Factor-eliminating technical change," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(4), pages 459-473.
    2. Roback, Jennifer, 1988. "Wages, Rents, and Amenities: Differences among Workers and Regions," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 26(1), pages 23-41, January.
    3. Gerald A. Carlino, 2009. "Beautiful city," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q3, pages 10-17.
    4. Edward L. Glaeser & Joshua D. Gottlieb, 2008. "The Economics of Place-Making Policies," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 39(1 (Spring), pages 155-253.
    5. Christopher R. Berry & Edward L. Glaeser, 2005. "The Divergence of Human Capital Levels Across Cities," NBER Working Papers 11617, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Alberto Dalmazzo & Guido De Blasio, 2007. "Skill-Biased Agglomeration Effects and Amenities: Theory with an Application to Italian Cities," Department of Economics University of Siena 503, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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