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Start-ups, Long- and Short-Term Survivors and their Effect on Regional Employment Growth

  • Michael Fritsch

    ()

  • Florian Noseleit

    ()

We investigate the effects that regional start-up activity has on employment in new and in incumbent businesses. The analysis is performed for West German regions over the 1987-2002 period. It shows that the effects of new businesses on employment in the incumbents are significantly positive and that this indirect effect on incumbent employment leads to more jobs than what is created by the newcomers. We find that the effect of new business formation on incumbents is exclusively driven by start-ups that survive a certain period of time. We draw conclusions for policy and for further research.

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File URL: http://www-sre.wu.ac.at/ersa/ersaconfs/ersa10/ERSA2010finalpaper1102.pdf
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Paper provided by European Regional Science Association in its series ERSA conference papers with number ersa10p1102.

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Date of creation: Sep 2011
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Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa10p1102
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  1. Michael Fritsch, 2008. "How does new business formation affect regional development? Introduction to the special issue," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 1-14, January.
  2. Philippe Aghion & Richard Blundell & Rachel Griffith & Peter Howitt & Susanne Prantl, 2004. "Entry and Productivity Growth: Evidence from Microlevel Panel Data," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 2(2-3), pages 265-276, 04/05.
  3. David Audretsch & Michael Fritsch, 2002. "Growth Regimes over Time and Space," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(2), pages 113-124.
  4. Pamela Mueller & André Stel & David Storey, 2008. "The effects of new firm formation on regional development over time: The case of Great Britain," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 59-71, January.
  5. Uwe Blien & Jens Suedekum & Katja Wolf, 2005. "Local Employment Growth in West Germany - A Dynamic Panel Approach," ERSA conference papers ersa05p620, European Regional Science Association.
  6. Südekum, Jens, 2008. "Convergence of the skill composition across German regions," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 148-159, March.
  7. Glaeser, Edward Ludwig & Kallal, Hedi D. & Scheinkman, Jose A. & Shleifer, Andrei, 1992. "Growth in Cities," Scholarly Articles 3451309, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  8. Franz Kronthaler, 2005. "Economic capability of East German regions: Results of a cluster analysis," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(6), pages 739-750.
  9. Michael Fritsch & Pamela Mueller, 2006. "The Effect of New Business Formation on Regional Development over Time: The Case of Germany," Papers on Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy 2006-19, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy Group.
  10. Boeri, Tito & Cramer, Ulrich, 1992. "Employment growth, incumbents and entrants : Evidence from Germany," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 545-565, December.
  11. Pier-Paolo Saviotti & Andreas Pyka, 2004. "Economic Development, Variety and Employment," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 55(6), pages 1023-1049.
  12. Paul M Romer, 1999. "Endogenous Technological Change," Levine's Working Paper Archive 2135, David K. Levine.
  13. Stephen Redding & Daniel Sturm, 2006. "The Costs of Remoteness: Evidence from German Division and Reunification," 2006 Meeting Papers 283, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  14. Michael Peneder, 2002. "Industrial Structure and Aggregate Growth," WIFO Working Papers 182, WIFO.
  15. Arauzo Carod, Josep Maria & Liviano Solís, Daniel & Martín Bofarull, Mònica, 2006. "New business formation and employment growth: some evidence for the Spanish manufacturing industry," Working Papers 2072/3686, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
  16. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
  17. Wagner, Joachim, 1994. "The Post-entry Performance of New Small Firms in German Manufacturing Industries," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(2), pages 141-54, June.
  18. Michael Fritsch & Florian Noseleit, 2013. "Investigating the anatomy of the employment effect of new business formation," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 37(2), pages 349-377.
  19. Falck, Oliver, 2005. "Mayflies and long-distance runners: The effects of new business formation on industry growth," Passauer Diskussionspapiere, Volkswirtschaftliche Reihe V-39-05, University of Passau, Faculty of Business and Economics.
  20. Klepper, Steven, 1996. "Entry, Exit, Growth, and Innovation over the Product Life Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(3), pages 562-83, June.
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