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Shadow Economy, Rent-Seeking Activities and the Perils of Reinforcement of the Rule of Law

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  • Ekaterina Vostroknutova

Abstract

An economy is considered where a possibility to seek rents (a particular case of this activity is corruption) exists along with production. A producer is able to hide part of his output from both bribery and taxation. It is shown that the presence of a shadow sector has di?erent e?ects in economies with high and low rent-seeking. As expected, in the economy with low corruption the direct law enforcement is bene- ficial for growth, and reduces the shadow sector. However, in the highly corrupt economy, combating the shadow economy reduces output and increases corruption, while combating corruption reduces the shadow economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Ekaterina Vostroknutova, 2003. "Shadow Economy, Rent-Seeking Activities and the Perils of Reinforcement of the Rule of Law," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 2003-578, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  • Handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:2003-578
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    Cited by:

    1. Clara Delavallade, 2007. "Why do North African firms involve in corruption?," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne v07002, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    2. Clara Delavallade, 2012. "What Drives Corruption? Evidence from North African Firms," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 21(4), pages 499-547, August.
    3. Maxim Bouev, 2005. "State Regulations, Job Search and Wage Bargaining: A Study in the Economics of the Informal Sector," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp764, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    4. Ramon Casadesus-Masanell & Tarun Khanna, 2003. "Globalization and Trust: Theory and Evidence from Cooperatives," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp592, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    corruption; rent-seeking; shadow economy; law enforcement; transition;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • H26 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Tax Evasion and Avoidance
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law

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