IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wbk/wbrwps/7306.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Crop choice and infrastructure accessibility in Tanzania : subsistence crops or export crops ?

Author

Listed:
  • Iimi,Atsushi
  • Humphreys,Richard Martin
  • Melibaeva,Sevara

Abstract

Africa has great potential for agriculture. Although international commodity prices have been buoyant, Africa?s supply response seems to be weak. A variety of constraints may exist. Using the case of Tanzania, the paper examines the impact of market connectivity, domestic and international, on farmers? crop choices. It is shown that the international market connectivity, measured by transport costs to the maritime port, is important for farmers to choose export crops, such as cotton and tobacco. Internal connectivity to the domestic market is also found to be important for growing food crops, such as maize and rice. Among other inputs, access to irrigation and improved seed availability are also important factors in the crop choices of farmers. The size of land area is one constraint to promote the crop shift. The paper also reports the finding that farmers are not using market prices effectively in their choice of crop, even after the endogeneity of local prices is taken into account.

Suggested Citation

  • Iimi,Atsushi & Humphreys,Richard Martin & Melibaeva,Sevara, 2015. "Crop choice and infrastructure accessibility in Tanzania : subsistence crops or export crops ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7306, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7306
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2015/06/15/090224b082f31f09/1_0/Rendered/PDF/Crop0choice0an0ps0or0export0crops00.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Andrew Dillon, 2011. "Do Differences in the Scale of Irrigation Projects Generate Different Impacts on Poverty and Production?," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(2), pages 474-492, June.
    2. Kiiza, Barnabas & Pederson, Glenn, 2012. "ICT-based market information and adoption of agricultural seed technologies: Insights from Uganda," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 253-259.
    3. Taryn Dinkelman, 2011. "The Effects of Rural Electrification on Employment: New Evidence from South Africa," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(7), pages 3078-3108, December.
    4. Ken Gwilliam, 2011. "Africa's Transport Infrastructure : Mainstreaming Maintenance and Management," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2275, November.
    5. Zhiying Xu & Zhengfei Guan & T.S. Jayne & Roy Black, 2009. "Factors influencing the profitability of fertilizer use on maize in Zambia," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(4), pages 437-446, July.
    6. Stephan Klasen & Jan Priebe & Robert Rudolf, 2013. "Cash crop choice and income dynamics in rural areas: evidence for post-crisis Indonesia," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 44(3), pages 349-364, May.
    7. Giacomo Zanello, 2012. "Mobile Phones and Radios: Effects on Transactions Costs and Market Participation for Households in Northern Ghana," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(3), pages 694-714, September.
    8. Frank Place & S. E. Migot-Adholla, 1998. "The Economic Effects of Land Registration on Smallholder Farms in Kenya: Evidence from Nyeri and Kakamega Districts," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 74(3), pages 360-373.
    9. Shahidur R. Khandker & Zaid Bakht & Gayatri B. Koolwal, 2009. "The Poverty Impact of Rural Roads: Evidence from Bangladesh," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 57(4), pages 685-722, July.
    10. Georgina Moreno & David L. Sunding, 2005. "Joint Estimation of Technology Adoption and Land Allocation with Implications for the Design of Conservation Policy," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(4), pages 1009-1019.
    11. Svetlana Edmeades & Daniel J. Phaneuf & Melinda Smale & Mitch Renkow, 2008. "Modelling the Crop Variety Demand of Semi-Subsistence Households: Bananas in Uganda," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 59(2), pages 329-349, June.
    12. Vivien Procher, 2011. "Agglomeration effects and the location of FDI: evidence from French first-time movers," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 46(2), pages 295-312, April.
    13. Claudio Bravo-Ortega & Daniel Lederman, 2004. "Agricultural productivity and its determinants: revisiting international experiences," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 31(2 Year 20), pages 133-163, December.
    14. Marc F. Bellemare, 2013. "The Productivity Impacts of Formal and Informal Land Rights: Evidence from Madagascar," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 89(2), pages 272-290.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Joglekar, Alison B. & Pardey, Philip G., 2016. "Proximity to African Agricultural Markets, Down to the Last Kilometer," Briefs 253951, HarvestChoice.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Transport Economics Policy&Planning; Climate Change and Agriculture; Regional Economic Development; Agriculture and Farming Systems; Crops and Crop Management Systems;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7306. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Roula I. Yazigi). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/dvewbus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.