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Banking sector stability, efficiency, and outreach in Kenya

Author

Listed:
  • Beck, Thorsten
  • Cull, Robert
  • Fuchs, Michael
  • Getenga, Jared
  • Gatere, Peter
  • Randa, John
  • Trandafir, Mircea

Abstract

Although Kenya's financial system is by far the largest and most developed in East Africa and its stability has improved significantly over the past years, many challenges remain. This paper assesses the stability, efficiency, and outreach of Kenya's banking system, usingaggregate, bank-level, and survey data. Banks'asset quality and liquidity positions have improved, making the system more resistant to shocks, and interest rate spreads have declined, in part due to reduction in the overhead costs of foreign banks. Outreach remains limited, but has improved in recent years, driven by mobile payments services in the domestic remittance market. Fostering a level regulatory playing field for all deposit-taking institutions is a key remaining challenge. Specifically, an effective but not overly burdensome framework for regulation and supervision of microfinance institutions and cooperatives is a priority. Maintaining an openness to new, and non-bank, providers of financial services, which has enabled the success of mobile payments, could also further outreach.

Suggested Citation

  • Beck, Thorsten & Cull, Robert & Fuchs, Michael & Getenga, Jared & Gatere, Peter & Randa, John & Trandafir, Mircea, 2010. "Banking sector stability, efficiency, and outreach in Kenya," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5442, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5442
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Maria Soledad Martinez Peria & Ashoka Mody, 2004. "How foreign participation and market concentration impact bank spreads: evidence from Latin America," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 511-542.
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    Cited by:

    1. Singer, D.E.M., 2013. "The role of institutions in international finance," Other publications TiSEM 28cd8e4c-3d06-499a-b37b-a, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    2. Jacob Oduor & Moses Muse Sichei & Samuel Kiplangat Tiriongo & Chris Shimba, 2014. "Working Paper 202 - Segmentation and efficiency of the interbank market and their implication for the conduct of monetary policy," Working Paper Series 2106, African Development Bank.
    3. Martin Brown & Benjamin Guin & Karolin Kirschenmann, 2016. "Microfinance Banks and Financial Inclusion," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 20(3), pages 907-946.
    4. Beck, Thorsten & Demirgüç-Kunt, Asli & Singer, Dorothe, 2013. "Is Small Beautiful? Financial Structure, Size and Access to Finance," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 19-33.
    5. Beck, Thorsten & Brown, Martin, 2011. "Use of Banking Services in Emerging Markets--Household-Level Evidence," CEPR Discussion Papers 8475, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Allen, Franklin & Carletti, Elena & Cull, Robert & Qian, Jun & Senbet, Lemma & Valenzuela, Patricio, 2013. "Improving access to banking : evidence from Kenya," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6593, The World Bank.
    7. Florian LEON, 2015. "What do we know about the role of bank competition in Africa?," Working Papers 201516, CERDI.
    8. Kangni R Kpodar & Mihasonirina Andrianaivo, 2011. "ICT, Financial Inclusion, and Growth; Evidence from African Countries," IMF Working Papers 11/73, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Beck, T.H.L. & Brown, M., 2011. "Use of Banking Services in Emerging Markets -Household-Level Evidence (Replaces CentER DP 2010-092)," Discussion Paper 2011-089, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    10. Beck, Thorsten & Brown, Martin, 2015. "Foreign bank ownership and household credit," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 466-486.
    11. Kodongo, Odongo & Natto, Dinah & Biekpe, Nicholas, 2015. "Explaining cross-border bank expansion in East Africa," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 71-84.
    12. Beck, Thorsten & Brown, Martin, 2011. "Which households use banks? Evidence from the transition economies," Working Paper Series 1295, European Central Bank.
    13. Brown, Martin & Guin, Benjamin & Kirschenmann, Karolin, 2013. "Microfinance Banks and Household Access to Finance," Working Papers on Finance 1302, University of St. Gallen, School of Finance.
    14. Fanta Ashenafi Beyene & Makina Daniel, 2016. "The Finance Growth Link: Comparative Analysis of Two Eastern African Countries," Comparative Economic Research, Sciendo, vol. 19(3), pages 147-167, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Banks&Banking Reform; Access to Finance; Debt Markets; Emerging Markets; Bankruptcy and Resolution of Financial Distress;

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