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An analysis of various policy instruments to reduce congestion, fuel consumption and CO2 emissions in Beijing

Author

Listed:
  • Anas, Alex
  • Timilsina, Govinda R.
  • Zheng, Siqi

Abstract

Using a nested multinomial logit model of car ownership and personal travel in Beijing circa 2005, this paper compares the effectiveness of different policy instruments to reduce traffic congestion and CO2 emissions. The study shows that a congestion toll is more efficient than a fuel tax in reducing traffic congestion, whereas a fuel tax is more effective as a policy instrument for reducing gasoline consumption and emissions. An improvement in car efficiency would also reduce congestion, fuel consumption, and CO2 emissions significantly; however, this policy benefits only richer households that own a car. Low-income households do better under the fuel tax policy than under the efficiency improvement and congestion toll policies. The congestion toll and fuel tax require the travel cost per mile to more than triple. The responsiveness of aggregate fuel and CO2 are, approximately, a 1 percent drop for each 10 percent rise in the money cost of a car trip.

Suggested Citation

  • Anas, Alex & Timilsina, Govinda R. & Zheng, Siqi, 2009. "An analysis of various policy instruments to reduce congestion, fuel consumption and CO2 emissions in Beijing," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5068, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5068
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    File URL: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2009/10/06/000158349_20091006110044/Rendered/PDF/WPS5068.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Parry, Ian W.H. & Timilsina, Govinda R., 2010. "How should passenger travel in Mexico City be priced?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 167-182, September.
    2. Anas, Alex & Rhee, Hyok-Joo, 2006. "Curbing excess sprawl with congestion tolls and urban boundaries," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 510-541, July.
    3. Nicol, C. J., 2003. "Elasticities of demand for gasoline in Canada and the United States," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 201-214, March.
    4. Anas, Alex & Pines, David, 2008. "Anti-sprawl policies in a system of congested cities," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 408-423, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Parry, Ian W.H. & Timilsina, Govinda R., 2012. "Demand side instruments to reduce road transportation externalities in the greater Cairo metropolitan area," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6083, The World Bank.
    2. Siqi Zheng & Matthew E. Kahn, 2013. "Understanding China's Urban Pollution Dynamics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 51(3), pages 731-772, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Transport Economics Policy&Planning; Airports and Air Services; Roads&Highways; Transport and Environment; Transport in Urban Areas; Urban Transport;

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