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Measuring microfinance access : building on existing cross-country data

Author

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  • Honohan, Patrick

Abstract

Given the acknowledged need for a new effort to expand the set of available data on direct access to financial services, including a focus on access by those at low income, Honohan provides a selective review of the diverse sources of data that exist and considers how best to build on them. He proposes a basic framework within which to consider the analysis of the interesting questions: (1) How does access affect poverty and productivity? and (2) What hinders access? The author discusses existing and potential contribution of household and business user surveys, surveys of providers and their regulators, and surveys of experts, and assesses their relative strengths.

Suggested Citation

  • Honohan, Patrick, 2005. "Measuring microfinance access : building on existing cross-country data," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3606, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3606
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ross Levine, 1997. "Financial Development and Economic Growth: Views and Agenda," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(2), pages 688-726, June.
    2. Xavier Giné & Pamela Jakiela & Dean Karlan & Jonathan Morduch, 2010. "Microfinance Games," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(3), pages 60-95, July.
    3. Arne Bigsten & Paul Collier & Stefan Dercon & Marcel Fafchamps & Bernard Gauthier & Jan Willem Gunning & Abena Oduro & Remco Oostendorp & Cathy Patillo & Måns S–derbom & Francis Teal & Albert Zeufack, 2003. "Credit Constraints in Manufacturing Enterprises in Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 12(1), pages 104-125, March.
    4. Beck, Thorsten & Demirguc-Kunt, Asli & Maksimovic, Vojislav, 2002. "Financial and legal constraints to firm growth - Does size matter?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2784, The World Bank.
    5. Patrick Honohan, 2004. "Financial Sector Policy and the Poor : Selected Findings and Issues," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14874, April.
    6. Beck, Thorsten & Demirguc-Kant, Asl' & Maksimovic, Vojislav, 2003. "Bank competition, financing obstacles, and access to credit," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2996, The World Bank.
    7. Geeta Batra & Daniel Kaufmann & Andrew H. W. Stone, 2003. "Investment Climate Around the World : Voices of the Firms from the World Business Environment Survey," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15143, April.
    8. Chaves, R.A. & Sanchez, S. & Schor, S. & Tesliuc, E., 2001. "Financial Markets, Credit Constraints, and Investment in Rural Romania," Papers 499, World Bank - Technical Papers.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Honohan, Patrick, 2008. "Cross-country variation in household access to financial services," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(11), pages 2493-2500, November.
    2. Honohan, Patrick, 2006. "Household Financial Assets in the Process of Development," WIDER Working Paper Series 091, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Beck, Thorsten & de la Torre, Augusto, 2006. "The basic analytics of access to financial services," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4026, The World Bank.
    4. Robert Cull & Kinnon Scott, 2010. "Measuring Household Usage of Financial Services: Does it Matter How or Whom You Ask?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 24(2), pages 199-233, April.
    5. Claessens, Stijn & Feijen, Erik, 2006. "Finance and hunger : empirical evidence of the agricultural productivity channel," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4080, The World Bank.
    6. Peter Benczur & Zsombor Cseres-Gergely & Peter Harasztosi, 2017. "EU-wide income inequality in the era of the Great Recession," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 1713, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    7. Annabel Vanroose, 2008. "What macro factors make microfinance institutions reach out?," Working Papers CEB 08-036.RS, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    8. Honohan, Patrick, 2005. "Banking sector crises and inequality," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3659, The World Bank.

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