IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wbk/wbrwps/3231.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Incidence analysis of public support to the private education sector in Cote d'Ivoire

Author

Listed:
  • Sakellariou, Chris
  • Patrinos, Harry Anthony

Abstract

This report analyzes the equity effects of public subsidization of private schools in Cote d'Ivoire, updates previous analyses, and attempts to assess how efficiently public spending is targeted. The subsidy per student in private (and public) schools increases at higher quintiles. Students from families in the highest quintile receive more than twice the subsidy received by students from families in the lowestquintile, compared with four times more in the case of students attending public schools. However, the subsidy system is progressive as there is a clear tendency for the share of family education expenditure covered by subsidies to decline at higher quintiles. This element of progressivity is stronger in the case of private school attendance.

Suggested Citation

  • Sakellariou, Chris & Patrinos, Harry Anthony, 2004. "Incidence analysis of public support to the private education sector in Cote d'Ivoire," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3231, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3231
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2004/04/15/000009486_20040415090459/Rendered/PDF/wps3231coted0ivoire.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Castro-Leal, Florencia & Dayton, Julia & Demery, Lionel & Mehra, Kalpana, 1999. "Public Social Spending in Africa: Do the Poor Benefit?," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 14(1), pages 49-72, February.
    2. W. Lee Hansen & Burton A. Weisbrod, 1969. "The Distribution of Costs and Direct Benefits of Public Higher Education: The Case of California," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 4(2), pages 176-191.
    3. GĂ©rard Lassibille & Jee-Peng Tan & Sumra Suleman, 1998. "Expansion of Private Secondary Education," Post-Print halshs-01365114, HAL.
    4. Selden, Thomas M. & Wasylenko, Michael J., 1992. "Benefit incidence analysis in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1015, The World Bank.
    5. Jimenez, Emmanuel & Sawada, Yasuyuki, 2001. "Public for private: the relationship between public and private school enrollment in the Philippines," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 389-399, August.
    6. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    7. Manos Antoninis & Panos Tsakloglou, 2001. "Who Benefits from Public Education in Greece? Evidence and Policy Implications," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 197-222.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Muhammad Akram & Faheem Jehangir Khan, 2007. "Public Provision of Education and Government Spending in Pakistan," PIDE-Working Papers 2007:40, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.
    2. Muhammad Akram & Faheem Jehangir Khan, 2007. "Health Care Services and Government Spending in Pakistan," Governance Working Papers 22184, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    3. Ahmed Nawaz Hakro & Muhammed Akram, 2007. "The Incidence of Government Expenditures on Education and Health: Microeconomic Evidence from Pakistan," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 12(2), pages 27-48, Jul-Dec.
    4. World Bank, 2013. "Republic of Madagascar : Mitigating the Impact of the Crisis on Education," World Bank Other Operational Studies 17012, The World Bank.
    5. Harry Anthony Patrinos & Felipe Barrera-Osorio & Juliana Guaqueta, 2009. "The Role and Impact of Public-Private Partnerships in Education," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2612, April.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3231. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Roula I. Yazigi). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/dvewbus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.