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Public Provision of Education and Government Spending in Pakistan

  • Muhammad Akram

    (International Institute of Islamic Economics, International Islamic University, Islamabad.)

  • Faheem Jehangir Khan

    (Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, Islamabad)

The study has been carried out to measure the incidence of government spending on education in Pakistan at the provincial (both rural and urban) level, using the primary data of the Pakistan Social Standard Living Measures Survey (PSLM), 2004-2005, and by employing the three-step Benefit Incidence Approach methodology. The paper reviews the national policies emphasising provision of education in Pakistan, as well as the trend in coverage and public sector spending on education facilities in Pakistan. The study examines the inequalities in resource distribution and service provision in relation to the government education expenditure. The rural areas of Pakistan are the more disadvantaged in the provision of the education facilities. Overall, the expenditure on the education sector is progressive, both at the regional and the provincial levels. However, variation exists in the shares of different income groups’ benefit from the provision of educational facilities created by public expenditure.

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File URL: http://www.pide.org.pk/pdf/Working%20Paper/WorkingPaper-40.pdf
File Function: First Version, 2007
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Paper provided by Pakistan Institute of Development Economics in its series PIDE-Working Papers with number 2007:40.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pid:wpaper:2007:40
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  1. David E. Sahn & Stephen D. Younger, 2000. "Expenditure incidence in Africa: microeconomic evidence," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 21(3), pages 329-347, September.
  2. Gemmell, Norman, 1985. "The Incidence of Government Expenditure and Redistribution in the United Kingdom," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 52(27), pages 335-44, August.
  3. Sakellariou, Chris & Patrinos, Harry Anthony, 2004. "Incidence analysis of public support to the private education sector in Cote d'Ivoire," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3231, The World Bank.
  4. Psacharopoulos, George, 1993. "Returns to investment in education : a global update," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1067, The World Bank.
  5. Husain, Fazal & Qasim, Muhammad Ali & Sheikh, Khalid Hameed, 2003. "Analysis of Public Expenditure on Education in Pakistan," MPRA Paper 2722, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Gupta, Sanjeev & Verhoeven, Marijn & Tiongson, Erwin R., 2002. "The effectiveness of government spending on education and health care in developing and transition economies," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 717-737, November.
  7. Erwin Tiongson & Hamid Reza Davoodi & Sawitree S. Asawanuchit, 2003. "How Useful Are Benefit Incidence Analyses of Public Education and Health Spending," IMF Working Papers 03/227, International Monetary Fund.
  8. Stephen D. Younger, 1999. "The Relative Progressivity of Social Services in Ecuador," Public Finance Review, , vol. 27(3), pages 310-352, May.
  9. Gustafsson, Bjorn & Li, Shi, 2004. "Expenditures on education and health care and poverty in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 292-301.
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