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China - From Poor Areas to Poor People : China’s Evolving Poverty Reduction Agenda - An Assessment of Poverty and Inequality in China

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  • World Bank

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Suggested Citation

  • World Bank, 2009. "China - From Poor Areas to Poor People : China’s Evolving Poverty Reduction Agenda - An Assessment of Poverty and Inequality in China," World Bank Other Operational Studies 3033, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wboper:3033
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    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/3033/480580v10Revised0Box338876B01Public10.pdf?sequence=1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Benu Bidani & Niels-Hugo Blunch & Chor-Ching Goh & Christopher O'Leary, 2009. "Evaluating job training in two Chinese cities," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 77-94.
    2. Loren Brandt & Scott Rozelle & Matthew A. Turner, 2004. "Local Government Behavior and Property Right Formation in Rural China," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 160(4), pages 627-627, December.
    3. Brandt, Loren & Holz, Carsten A, 2006. "Spatial Price Differences in China: Estimates and Implications," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 55(1), pages 43-86, October.
    4. Appleton, Simon & Knight, John & Song, Lina & Xia, Qingjie, 2002. "Labor retrenchment in China: Determinants and consequences," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(2-3), pages 252-275.
    5. Chun-Chung Au & J. Vernon Henderson, 2006. "Are Chinese Cities Too Small?," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 73(3), pages 549-576.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:touman:v:33:y:2012:i:2:p:239-248 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Meng, Xin & Xue, Sen, 2017. "Social Networks and Mental Health Problems: Evidence from Rural-to-Urban Migrants in China," IZA Discussion Papers 10481, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Golan, Jennifer & Sicular, Terry & Umapathi, Nithin, 2017. "Unconditional Cash Transfers in China: Who Benefits from the Rural Minimum Living Standard Guarantee (Dibao) Program?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 316-336.

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