IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/iza/izadps/dp8244.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Data for Studying Earnings, the Distribution of Household Income and Poverty in China

Author

Listed:
  • Gustafsson, Björn Anders

    () (University of Gothenburg)

  • Li, Shi

    () (Beijing Normal University)

  • Sato, Hiroshi

    () (Hitotsubashi University)

Abstract

This paper discusses data used in publishing statistics on earnings, the distribution of household income and poverty in China by the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) which is widely used by policy makers, international agencies and researchers. Unlike many other countries, China until recently had a dual system of household surveys - one rural and one urban. This has had consequences for providing official data on wages, income and poverty which we discuss along with other challenges. Since the end of the 1980s, researchers have been active in the construction of large databases aimed at mapping earnings, household income and poverty, and we present seven of these in the paper.

Suggested Citation

  • Gustafsson, Björn Anders & Li, Shi & Sato, Hiroshi, 2014. "Data for Studying Earnings, the Distribution of Household Income and Poverty in China," IZA Discussion Papers 8244, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8244
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp8244.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Wenshu Gao & Russell Smyth, 2012. "Returns to Schooling in Urban China, 2001-2010: Evidence from Three Waves of the China Urban Labor Survey," Monash Economics Working Papers 50-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    2. John Micklewright & Sylke V. Schnepf, 2010. "How reliable are income data collected with a single question?," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 173(2), pages 409-429.
    3. Aaberge, Rolf & Zhu, Yu, 2001. "The Pattern of Household Savings during a Hyperinflation: The Case of Urban China in the Late 1980s," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 47(2), pages 181-202, June.
    4. Meng, Xin & Shen, Kailing & Xue, Sen, 2013. "Economic reform, education expansion, and earnings inequality for urban males in China, 1988–2009," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 227-244.
    5. Brandt, Loren & Holz, Carsten A, 2006. "Spatial Price Differences in China: Estimates and Implications," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 55(1), pages 43-86, October.
    6. John Gibson & Jikun Huang & Scott Rozelle, 2003. "Improving Estimates of Inequality and Poverty from Urban China's Household Income and Expenditure Survey," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 49(1), pages 53-68, March.
    7. repec:wyi:journl:002165 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Benjamin, Dwayne & Brandt, Loren & Giles, John, 2005. "The Evolution of Income Inequality in Rural China," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(4), pages 769-824, July.
    9. Fang, Cheng & Zhang, Xiaobo & Fan, Shenggen, 2002. "Emergence of urban poverty and inequality in China: evidence from household survey," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 430-443, December.
    10. Shi Li & Yaohui Zhao, 2003. "The Decline of In-kind Wage Payments in Urban China," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(2), pages 245-258.
    11. McCulloch, Neil & Calandrino, Michele, 2003. "Vulnerability and Chronic Poverty in Rural Sichuan," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 611-628, March.
    12. Chen, Shaohua & Ravallion, Martin, 1996. "Data in transition: Assessing rural living standards in Southern China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 23-56.
    13. Zhang, Junsen & Zhao, Yaohui & Park, Albert & Song, Xiaoqing, 2005. "Economic returns to schooling in urban China, 1988 to 2001," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 730-752, December.
    14. Terry Sicular & Yue Ximing & Björn Gustafsson & Li Shi, 2007. "The Urban-Rural Income Gap And Inequality In China," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 53(1), pages 93-126, March.
    15. Liu, Qian, 2012. "Unemployment and labor force participation in urban China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 18-33.
    16. Giles, John & Park, Albert & Zhang, Juwei, 2005. "What is China's true unemployment rate?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 149-170.
    17. Hiroshi Sato & Terry Sicular & Ximing Yue, 2011. "Housing Ownership, Incomes, and Inequality in China, 2002-2007," University of Western Ontario, Centre for Human Capital and Productivity (CHCP) Working Papers 201112, University of Western Ontario, Centre for Human Capital and Productivity (CHCP).
    18. E. Paul Durrenberger, 2012. "Labour," Chapters,in: A Handbook of Economic Anthropology, Second Edition, chapter 8 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    19. Aaberge, Rolf & Li, Xuezeng, 1997. "The Trend in Urban Income Inequality in Two Chinese Provinces, 1986-90," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 43(3), pages 335-355, September.
    20. James P. Smith & Yan Shen & John Strauss & Yang Zhe & Yaohui Zhao, 2012. "The Effects of Childhood Health on Adult Health and SES in China," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 61(1), pages 127-156.
    21. Kung, James K S & Lee, Yiu-fai, 2001. "So What If There Is Income Inequality? The Distributive Consequence of Nonfarm Employment in Rural China," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 50(1), pages 19-46, October.
    22. Li, Hongbin & Zhang, Junsen & Sin, Lai Ting & Zhao, Yaohui, 2006. "Relative earnings of husbands and wives in urban China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 412-431.
    23. Mehtap Akgüç & Corrado Giulietti & Klaus Zimmermann, 2014. "The RUMiC longitudinal survey: fostering research on labor markets in China," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-14, December.
    24. Chi, Wei & Li, Bo, 2008. "Glass ceiling or sticky floor? Examining the gender earnings differential across the earnings distribution in urban China, 1987-2004," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 243-263, June.
    25. David Coady & Limin Wang, 2000. "Incentives, allocation and labour-market reforms during transition: the case of urban China, 1986-1990," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(4), pages 511-526.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Zhang, Yanlong & Zhou, Xiaoyu & Lei, Wei, 2017. "Social Capital and Its Contingent Value in Poverty Reduction: Evidence from Western China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 350-361.
    2. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:4:p:575-:d:95364 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Howell, Anthony, 2017. "Impacts of Migration and Remittances on Ethnic Income Inequality in Rural China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 200-211.
    4. Yin, Dongxue & Liu, Wei & Zhai, Ningning & Wang, Yandong & Ren, Chengjie & Yang, Gaihe, 2017. "Regional differentiation of rural household biogas development and related driving factors in China," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 1008-1018.
    5. Serhan Cevik & Carolina Correa-Caro, 2015. "Growing (Un)equal; Fiscal Policy and Income Inequality in China and BRIC+," IMF Working Papers 15/68, International Monetary Fund.
    6. repec:spr:soinre:v:132:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1387-1 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; data; poverty; inequality; income; earnings; National Bureau of Statistics;

    JEL classification:

    • C83 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Survey Methods; Sampling Methods
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • P36 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Consumer Economics; Health; Education and Training; Welfare, Income, Wealth, and Poverty

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8244. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mark Fallak). General contact details of provider: http://www.iza.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.