IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wbk/wboper/25341.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Europe and Central Asia Economic Update, November 2016

Author

Listed:
  • World Bank

Abstract

These are tough times for Europe and Central Asia. The Brexit vote and the refugee crisis are testing the European Union’s internal cohesion. Continued vulnerabilities in European banking sectors are curbing the economic recovery. Russia, Eastern Europe, Central Asia, and the Caucuses are still grappling with the consequences of low oil prices, increasingly compounded by low prices of other commodities. In Turkey, social and political tensions have increased in the aftermath of the coup attempt. Moreover, geopolitical frictions in the region further complicate the challenges. These turbulent economic times coincide with political polarization and rising populism. This likely reflects anxiety about unequal opportunities and decreasing job security, while low secular growth causes more pessimism about prospects. Coping with the structural challenges outlined above and limiting the rise in populism will require policies that support adjustment to these new economic realities while minimizing the pain that such adjustments can cause.

Suggested Citation

  • World Bank, "undated". "Europe and Central Asia Economic Update, November 2016," World Bank Other Operational Studies 25341, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wboper:25341
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/25341/9781464810091.pdf?sequence=5
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. repec:eme:reinzz:s1049-258520150000023001 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Andrew E. Clark & Conchita D’Ambrosio & Simone Ghislandi, 2015. "Poverty Profiles and Well-Being: Panel Evidence from Germany," Research on Economic Inequality,in: Measurement of Poverty, Deprivation, and Economic Mobility, volume 23, pages 1-22 Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    3. Gros, Daniel, 2012. "Macroeconomic Imbalances in the Euro Area: Symptom or cause of the crisis?," CEPS Papers 6865, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    4. Cancho,Cesar A. & Davalos,Maria Eugenia & Sanchez,Carolina, 2015. "Why so gloomy ? perceptions of economic mobility in Europe and Central Asia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7519, The World Bank.
    5. Cojocaru, Alexandru & Diagne, Mame Fatou, 2014. "Should income inequality be reduced and who should benefit ? redistributive preferences in Europe and Central Asia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7097, The World Bank.
    6. Irena Grosfeld & Claudia Senik, 2010. "The emerging aversion to inequality," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 18(1), pages 1-26, January.
    7. Cojocaru, Alexandru, 2014. "Fairness and inequality tolerance: Evidence from the Life in Transition Survey," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 590-608.
    8. X. Zhang & R. Kanbur, 2001. "What Difference Do Polarisation Measures Make? An Application to China," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(3), pages 85-98.
    9. Cojocaru, Alexandru, 2014. "Prospects of upward mobility and preferences for redistribution: Evidence from the Life in Transition Survey," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 300-314.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Simona Malovana, 2017. "Banks' Capital Surplus and the Impact of Additional Capital Requirements," Working Papers 2017/8, Czech National Bank, Research Department.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wboper:25341. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Breineder). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/dvewbus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.