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The output employment elasticity and the increased use of temporary contracts: evidence from Poland

Author

Listed:
  • Krzysztof Bartosik

    () (Institute of Economics of the Polish Academy of Sciences)

  • Jerzy Mycielski

    () (Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw)

Abstract

The paper investigates how increased use of temporary contracts has affected employment elasticity with respect to output in Poland. Our empirical analysis covers the period of 1996-2016, with particular focus on the years 2001-2016. Several econometric tools are used to explore the relation between growth in GDP and employment. Our study shows that widespread adoption of temporary contracts contributes positively to total employment elasticity. However, what we have observed is that the share of temporary contracts has increased, but the total employment elasticity has decreased. We related this to an inverse relationship between the growth of permanent and temporary employment and the opposite trends in output elasticities of temporary and permanent employment.

Suggested Citation

  • Krzysztof Bartosik & Jerzy Mycielski, 2017. "The output employment elasticity and the increased use of temporary contracts: evidence from Poland," Working Papers 2017-23, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
  • Handle: RePEc:war:wpaper:2017-23
    as

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    File URL: http://www.wne.uw.edu.pl/index.php/download_file/3956/
    File Function: First version, 2017
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    3. Andrew Benito & Ignacio Hernando, 2008. "Labour Demand, Flexible Contracts and Financial Factors: Firm‐Level Evidence from Spain," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 70(3), pages 283-301, June.
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    labour demand; temporary contracts; economic growth; labour market institutions;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • J41 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Labor Contracts

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