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Financial and insurance literacy in Poland

Author

Listed:
  • Marcin Kawiński

    (Warsaw School of Economics)

  • Piotr Majewski

    (WSB University in Toruń)

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to present critical analysis of different concepts related to financial literacy. Discussion of usefulness of standard questions on financial literacy and presenting data on the first Polish research of standard questions on financial literacy compared with selected countries. And finally presenting questionnaire for insurance literacy and findings from Polish research.

Suggested Citation

  • Marcin Kawiński & Piotr Majewski, 2017. "Financial and insurance literacy in Poland," Working Papers 2017-03, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
  • Handle: RePEc:war:wpaper:2017-03
    as

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    File URL: http://www.wne.uw.edu.pl/index.php/download_file/3298/
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial literacy; insurance literacy;

    JEL classification:

    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G22 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Insurance; Insurance Companies; Actuarial Studies
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General

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