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Do financial education programs work?

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  • Ian Hathaway
  • Sameer Khatiwada

Abstract

In this paper we provide a comprehensive critical analysis of research that has investigated the impact of financial education programs on consumer financial behavior. In light of the evidence, we recommend that future programs be highly targeted towards a specific audience and area of financial activity (e.g. homeownership or credit card counseling, etc.), and that this training occurs just before the corresponding financial event (e.g. purchase of a home or use of a credit card, etc.).

Suggested Citation

  • Ian Hathaway & Sameer Khatiwada, 2008. "Do financial education programs work?," Working Paper 0803, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedcwp:0803
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Khorunzhina, Natalia, 2013. "Structural estimation of stock market participation costs," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 2928-2942.
    2. Margaret Miller & Julia Reichelstein & Christian Salas & Bilal Zia, 2015. "Can You Help Someone Become Financially Capable? A Meta-Analysis of the Literature," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 30(2), pages 220-246.
    3. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2014. "The Economic Importance of Financial Literacy: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 52(1), pages 5-44, March.
    4. Giofré, Maela, 2017. "Financial education, investor protection and international portfolio diversification," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 111-139.
    5. Vernon Loke & Laura Choi & Margaret Libby, 2015. "Increasing Youth Financial Capability: An Evaluation of the MyPath Savings Initiative," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(1), pages 97-126, March.
    6. Geert Van Campenhout, 2015. "Revaluing the Role of Parents as Financial Socialization Agents in Youth Financial Literacy Programs," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(1), pages 186-222, March.
    7. M. A. Milioli & L. Poletti & B. Ronchini, 2011. "L’educazione finanziaria degli studenti universitari: misurazione e analisi delle determinanti," Economics Department Working Papers 2011-EF01, Department of Economics, Parma University (Italy).
    8. Ales S. BERK & Mitja COK & Marko KOSAK & Joze SAMBT, 2013. "CEE Transition from PAYG to Private Pensions: Income Gaps and Asset Allocation," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 63(4), pages 360-381, August.
    9. Aimee Prawitz & Julie Kalkowski & Judith Cohart, 2013. "Responses to Economic Pressure by Low-Income Families: Financial Distress and Hopefulness," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 29-40, March.
    10. Castro, Rubén & Fortunato, Andrés, 2015. "Is financial literacy an economic good?," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), August.
    11. Rist, Carl & Humphrey, Liana, 2010. "City and community innovations in CDAs: The role of community-based organizations," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(11), pages 1520-1527, November.
    12. French, Declan & McKillop, Donal, 2016. "Financial literacy and over-indebtedness in low-income households," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 1-11.
    13. Maria De Paola & Francesca Gioia & Fabio Piluso, 2017. "Does Reminding Of Behavioural Biases Increase Returns From Financial Trading? A Field Experiment," Working Papers 201705, Università della Calabria, Dipartimento di Economia, Statistica e Finanza "Giovanni Anania" - DESF.
    14. Nicole Senecal & Teresa Wang & Elizabeth Thompson & Joseph W. Kable, 2012. "Normative arguments from experts and peers reduce delay discounting," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 7(5), pages 568-589, September.
    15. Margaret Sherraden & Lissa Johnson & Baorong Guo & William Elliott, 2011. "Financial Capability in Children: Effects of Participation in a School-Based Financial Education and Savings Program," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(3), pages 385-399, September.
    16. Lauren E. Willis, 2011. "The Financial Education Fallacy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(3), pages 429-434, May.
    17. Marcin Kawiński & Piotr Majewski, 2017. "Financial and insurance literacy in Poland," Working Papers 2017-03, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    18. Angela Hung & Joanne Yoong & Elizabeth Brown, 2012. "Empowering Women Through Financial Awareness and Education," OECD Working Papers on Finance, Insurance and Private Pensions 14, OECD Publishing.
    19. Carlos J. Asarta & Andrew T. Hill & Bonnie T. Meszaros, 2013. "The Features and Effectiveness of the Keys to Financial Success Curriculum," Working Papers 13-13, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.

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    Keywords

    Financial literacy;

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