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Understanding the Global Dynamics of Sectoral Labor Productivity

Author

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  • Roberto Roson

    () (Department of Economics, University Of Venice Cà Foscari and IEFE, Bocconi University, Milan)

Abstract

This study provides some empirical evidence and quantification of differences in labor productivity among industries and countries. Using a recently available data base of value added per worker, country and time fixed effects are estimated first for various industries. Results are subsequently elaborated, to identify some time trends and sectoral profiles by country, which are in turn employed in a cluster analysis, summarizing some salient characteristics of industrial labor productivity in different economies.

Suggested Citation

  • Roberto Roson, 2017. "Understanding the Global Dynamics of Sectoral Labor Productivity," Working Papers 2017:15, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
  • Handle: RePEc:ven:wpaper:2017:15
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Fagerberg, Jan, 2000. "Technological progress, structural change and productivity growth: a comparative study," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 393-411, December.
    2. Margarida Duarte & Diego Restuccia, 2010. "The Role of the Structural Transformation in Aggregate Productivity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 125(1), pages 129-173.
    3. Fulvio Castellacci & Bart Los & Gaaitzen Vries, 2014. "Sectoral productivity trends: convergence islands in oceans of non-convergence," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 24(5), pages 983-1007, November.
    4. Dani Rodrik, 2016. "Premature deindustrialization," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 21(1), pages 1-33, March.
    5. Francisco J. Buera & Joseph P. Kaboski & Richard Rogerson, 2015. "Skill Biased Structural Change," NBER Working Papers 21165, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Justin Caron & Thibault Fally & James R. Markusen, 2014. "International Trade Puzzles: A Solution Linking Production and Preferences," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 129(3), pages 1501-1552.
    7. Chen, Shiyi & Jefferson, Gary H. & Zhang, Jun, 2011. "Structural change, productivity growth and industrial transformation in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 133-150, March.
    8. Jack E. Triplett & Barry P. Bosworth, 2003. "Productivity measurement issues in services industries: "Baumol's disease" has been cured," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Sep, pages 23-33.
    9. Richard Rogerson & Joseph Kaboski & Francisco Buera, 2015. "Skill-Biased Structural Change and the Skill Premium," 2015 Meeting Papers 895, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    10. Baumol, William J, 1986. "Productivity Growth, Convergence, and Welfare: What the Long-run Data Show," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(5), pages 1072-1085, December.
    11. Alwyn Young, 2014. "Structural Transformation, the Mismeasurement of Productivity Growth, and the Cost Disease of Services," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(11), pages 3635-3667, November.
    12. Young, Alwyn, 2014. "Structural transformation, the mismeasurement of productivity growth, and the cost disease of services," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60213, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    13. Haraguchi, Nobuya & Cheng, Charles Fang Chin & Smeets, Eveline, 2017. "The Importance of Manufacturing in Economic Development: Has This Changed?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 293-315.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labor productivity; structural change; economic dynamics; cluster analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C82 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Macroeconomic Data; Data Access
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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