IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ven/wpaper/2012_21.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Electric cars as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions: methods, results and policy implications in Germany

Author

Listed:
  • Jens Weinmann

    () (European School of Management and Technology, Berlin)

  • J�r�me MASSIANI

    (Department of Economics, University Of Venice C� Foscari)

Abstract

Electric vehicles are usually perceived by policy makers and the general public as an attractive means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper we provide a rigorous assessment of the emissions resulting from the diffusion of electric vehicles. We make use of EMOB, a comprehensive model that provides a forecast and evaluation of alternative fuel vehicles diffusion in Germany in the next decades. As far as computation of emissions is concerned, our method differs from existing one by a �pivotal marginal� or �hourly marginal� emission computation that takes into account the predicted long-term time pattern of EV reloading. We obtain non-tailpipe emissions of around 75 g/km in 2020. Additionally, our findings cast serious doubts on the general claim that electric cars could be fed in with renewable energy in general, and with fluctuating excess supply of renewables (wind, solar) in particular.

Suggested Citation

  • Jens Weinmann & J�r�me MASSIANI, 2012. "Electric cars as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions: methods, results and policy implications in Germany," Working Papers 2012_21, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari", revised 2012.
  • Handle: RePEc:ven:wpaper:2012_21
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.unive.it/pag/fileadmin/user_upload/dipartimenti/economia/doc/Pubblicazioni_scientifiche/working_papers/2012/WP_DSE_massiani_weinmann_21_12.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2012
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Fredrik Carlsson & Olof Johansson-Stenman, 2003. "Costs and Benefits of Electric Vehicles," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, University of Bath, vol. 37(1), pages 1-28, January.
    2. Doucette, Reed T. & McCulloch, Malcolm D., 2011. "Modeling the CO2 emissions from battery electric vehicles given the power generation mixes of different countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 803-811, February.
    3. Bettle, R. & Pout, C.H. & Hitchin, E.R., 2006. "Interactions between electricity-saving measures and carbon emissions from power generation in England and Wales," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(18), pages 3434-3446, December.
    4. Frank M. Bass, 1969. "A New Product Growth for Model Consumer Durables," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 15(5), pages 215-227, January.
    5. Smith, William J., 2010. "Can EV (electric vehicles) address Ireland’s CO2 emissions from transport?," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 35(12), pages 4514-4521.
    6. Kyle, Page & Kim, Son H., 2011. "Long-term implications of alternative light-duty vehicle technologies for global greenhouse gas emissions and primary energy demands," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 3012-3024, May.
    7. Thiel, Christian & Perujo, Adolfo & Mercier, Arnaud, 2010. "Cost and CO2 aspects of future vehicle options in Europe under new energy policy scenarios," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(11), pages 7142-7151, November.
    8. Hawkes, A.D., 2010. "Estimating marginal CO2 emissions rates for national electricity systems," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(10), pages 5977-5987, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    electric vehicles; CO2 emissions; generation portfolio; non tail-pipe emission;

    JEL classification:

    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • Q47 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy Forecasting
    • L62 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - Automobiles; Other Transportation Equipment; Related Parts and Equipment

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ven:wpaper:2012_21. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Geraldine Ludbrook). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/dsvenit.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.