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Labor Supply, Divorce and Remarriage

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Abstract

This paper considers the role of the entire marital history in labor market decisions. A distinction is made between married, remarried, single and divorced women in the estimation of standard participation and labor supply functions. In specifications controlling for unobserved individual heterogeneity, white remarried women are more likely to participate in the labor force and have higher labor supply than that of white married women. The results indicate that a substantial fraction of the total change in employment rates of all married women over time is due to the increase in the number of remarried women in the population.

Suggested Citation

  • Shannon N. Seitz, 1999. "Labor Supply, Divorce and Remarriage," UWO Department of Economics Working Papers 9902, University of Western Ontario, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwo:uwowop:9902
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    Cited by:

    1. Audra J. Bowlus & Shannon Seitz, 2006. "Domestic Violence, Employment, And Divorce," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 47(4), pages 1113-1149, November.
    2. Pierre-André Chiappori & Murat Iyigun & Yoram Weiss, 2009. "Investment in Schooling and the Marriage Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 1689-1713.
    3. Papps, Kerry L., 2006. "The Effects of Divorce Risk on the Labour Supply of Married Couples," IZA Discussion Papers 2395, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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